‘No need to fear senior ranks being open to non service people,’ says Wiltshire and Swindon police chief

Swindon Advertiser: Angus Macpherson, Police and Crime Commissioner for Wiltshire and Swindon Angus Macpherson, Police and Crime Commissioner for Wiltshire and Swindon

POLICE officers have nothing to fear from plans to allow senior ranks to be recruited from outside the service, says the county’s crime commissioner.

Police Minister Damian Green said the service would benefit from a wider talent pool as the plans were announced by the Home Office yesterday ahead of a consultation process.

The move follows the Winsor Review of police officer and staff renumeration and conditions, and would allow civilians to enter at superintendent level, new recruits can be fast-tracked to inspectors within three years and the chief constable role to be opened to applicants outside the UK, including the USA and Canada.

Angus Macpherson, Police and Crime Commissioner for Wiltshire and Swindon, said rank-and-file officers looking to climb the hierarchy should not be worried by the latest possible reform.

Mr Macpherson, who was voted into the post in November, said he has every confidence in the current senior leadership at Wiltshire Police, having recently appointed Patrick Geenty as Chief Constable from a strong field.

Mr Macpherson said: “There is a surprisingly defensive reaction from some senior leaders in other areas. In my experience, senior officers secure promotion in competition with their colleagues.

“I do not think they have anything to fear from widening the pool of applicants.

“The initiative sends a message that the national police service is a modern work-force receptive to new ideas.

“I will be giving my feedback on the consultation and encourage other people to do so.”

The move is the latest in a series of reforms of the police service – and morale among rank-and-file officers is said to be at a low.

However, Wiltshire Police Federation chairman Mike White said while there was some merit to the proposal, the risks outweighed the benefits.

He said: “We are constantly being told by the Government and others that we have the best police service in the world, so the question is what are we doing so wrong that we need to change the way management is structured.

“There is a bit of a misconception that there is not already direct entry into the police service already. When I first started the director of finance was a police officer, as was the director of HR and the head of IT.

“These have all changed and these are senior people involved in strategic and tactical decision making.

“We also already have the accelerated promotion scheme as an option for those joining.

“The problem of course is we could get the failed manager from Comet or HMV coming in without any sense of the world they are entering.

“We work in a world some people don’t know exists and having that grounding and problem solving ability means they are better placed to become the senior leaders of the future.

“An operational superintendent could be called upon to command a riot or quite often handle firearms incidents and there’s more risk if somebody is not experienced.

“We recognise there are positives but we are just trying to identify the risks.”

Comments (5)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

10:02am Thu 31 Jan 13

A.Baron-Cohen says...

If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......
If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs...... A.Baron-Cohen

11:50am Thu 31 Jan 13

Always Grumpy says...

A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......
Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?
[quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......[/p][/quote]Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'? Always Grumpy

12:28pm Thu 31 Jan 13

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Always Grumpy wrote:
A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......
Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?
I used the term "common" but some would use another: Plebe when talking to a Police officer for example. So I would say that 95% of the population would fall in that category.
The other 5% being made of Aristocrats, multimillionaires, Oxbridge privately educated elite like our current Government.
[quote][p][bold]Always Grumpy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......[/p][/quote]Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?[/p][/quote]I used the term "common" but some would use another: Plebe when talking to a Police officer for example. So I would say that 95% of the population would fall in that category. The other 5% being made of Aristocrats, multimillionaires, Oxbridge privately educated elite like our current Government. A.Baron-Cohen

2:33pm Thu 31 Jan 13

Always Grumpy says...

A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
Always Grumpy wrote:
A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......
Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?
I used the term "common" but some would use another: Plebe when talking to a Police officer for example. So I would say that 95% of the population would fall in that category.
The other 5% being made of Aristocrats, multimillionaires, Oxbridge privately educated elite like our current Government.
Well, you speak for yourself. If you consider yourself common, then that's up to you, but I do not consider myself common or less worthy that any members of the groups you have mentioned.
Who's called a police officer a pleb (not plebe)? You were there were you, rather like the apparent corrupt police officer who made the allegation? There's no evidence that anyone called a police officer a pleb.
For someone who thinks they know everything, you seem to be falling well short of the mark. But then I suppose that's a characteristic of someone who's common!
[quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Always Grumpy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......[/p][/quote]Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?[/p][/quote]I used the term "common" but some would use another: Plebe when talking to a Police officer for example. So I would say that 95% of the population would fall in that category. The other 5% being made of Aristocrats, multimillionaires, Oxbridge privately educated elite like our current Government.[/p][/quote]Well, you speak for yourself. If you consider yourself common, then that's up to you, but I do not consider myself common or less worthy that any members of the groups you have mentioned. Who's called a police officer a pleb (not plebe)? You were there were you, rather like the apparent corrupt police officer who made the allegation? There's no evidence that anyone called a police officer a pleb. For someone who thinks they know everything, you seem to be falling well short of the mark. But then I suppose that's a characteristic of someone who's common! Always Grumpy

3:34pm Thu 31 Jan 13

A.Baron-Cohen says...

Always Grumpy wrote:
A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
Always Grumpy wrote:
A.Baron-Cohen wrote:
If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......
Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?
I used the term "common" but some would use another: Plebe when talking to a Police officer for example. So I would say that 95% of the population would fall in that category.
The other 5% being made of Aristocrats, multimillionaires, Oxbridge privately educated elite like our current Government.
Well, you speak for yourself. If you consider yourself common, then that's up to you, but I do not consider myself common or less worthy that any members of the groups you have mentioned.
Who's called a police officer a pleb (not plebe)? You were there were you, rather like the apparent corrupt police officer who made the allegation? There's no evidence that anyone called a police officer a pleb.
For someone who thinks they know everything, you seem to be falling well short of the mark. But then I suppose that's a characteristic of someone who's common!
It is an interesting argument...however I am not foolish enough to believe that I belong to the higher echelon of Society.
I am comfortable with your statement that I am common, in truth I have far more in common with a factory worker, a postman, a nurse or a soldier than with any other member of the High Society.
[quote][p][bold]Always Grumpy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Always Grumpy[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]A.Baron-Cohen[/bold] wrote: If the common people can face increased job competition from EU and no EU workers, then it is sensible to expect the same for highly paid public sector jobs......[/p][/quote]Poor choice of words there. Who do you consider as 'common'?[/p][/quote]I used the term "common" but some would use another: Plebe when talking to a Police officer for example. So I would say that 95% of the population would fall in that category. The other 5% being made of Aristocrats, multimillionaires, Oxbridge privately educated elite like our current Government.[/p][/quote]Well, you speak for yourself. If you consider yourself common, then that's up to you, but I do not consider myself common or less worthy that any members of the groups you have mentioned. Who's called a police officer a pleb (not plebe)? You were there were you, rather like the apparent corrupt police officer who made the allegation? There's no evidence that anyone called a police officer a pleb. For someone who thinks they know everything, you seem to be falling well short of the mark. But then I suppose that's a characteristic of someone who's common![/p][/quote]It is an interesting argument...however I am not foolish enough to believe that I belong to the higher echelon of Society. I am comfortable with your statement that I am common, in truth I have far more in common with a factory worker, a postman, a nurse or a soldier than with any other member of the High Society. A.Baron-Cohen

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree