Bid to change lives by tackling obesity

From left, Debbie Mitchell, Lauren Roberts and  Hannah Williams at the launch of a new health

From left, Debbie Mitchell, Lauren Roberts and Hannah Williams at the launch of a new health

First published in News by

TACKLING obesity in teenagers and young adults, to reverse an increasingly alarming trend, is at the heart of a Swindon health pilot project due to be rolled out.

Swindon Council’s health team promoted the new #gethealthy programme at New College as part of Healthy Weight Awareness Week, which encourages people to adopt a healthier diet and transform their lifestyle one step at a time.

The initiative – being launched on January 30 – aims to plug a gap in provision for obese or overweight young people, aged 16 to 25, and forms part of the wider Triactive project, which started last August and will receive £250,000 over three years from Sport England.

The 10-week inaugural course will be held at New College. Each session will be split into two 45 minute-sessions: a workshop discussing a health topic, followed by a workout.

Triactive project coordinator Ben Humphrey said: “We have the MEND programme, which is for five to 16-year-olds, and Dietbusters for people over 16, but most people using it are 40 or 50. Young people can’t relate to them and feel the course is not for them.

“It follows the same syllabus as Dietbusters, but has been tweaked for that age group. So we will also talk to them about drinking fizzy drinks and getting enough sleep or reading food labels. We will discuss fats and sugars and healthy substitutes.”

If it proves a success, the course will be rolled out across town.

According to the latest figures released by Public Health England, 10.2 per cent of reception pupils in Swindon are obese, compared with 9.3 per cent nationally. By Year 6 – the end of primary school – the figure rises to 19.5 per cent against 18.9 nationally.

Ben said: “In Swindon, stats reflect the national trend, which is that obesity is on the increase. “The emphasis is often on being active, but that’s half of the battle. People have to look at their diet and what they put in their bodies.”

Sam Rose, 17, a student at New College, said the school was the ideal place to promote a health programme for young people.

“It’s a good idea and it can inspire people to think before drinking a fizzy drink or having a snack. Many people don’t think about what they eat or drink.”

The course costs £25 and participants get a £10 gift voucher upon its completion.

For details about #gethealthy, call Debbie Mitchell on 01793 864934 or email DMitchell2 @swindon.gov.uk.

To find out about Triactive, call Ben on 01793 465404 or email BHumphrey@swindon.gov.uk.

Comments (2)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

8:28am Thu 16 Jan 14

house on the hill says...

"""According to the latest figures released by Public Health England, 10.2 per cent of reception pupils in Swindon are obese, compared with 9.3 per cent nationally. By Year 6 – the end of primary school – the figure rises to 19.5 per cent against 18.9 nationally.""""

That is absolutely appalling that more than 1 in 10 4 year old's are obese and 2 in 10 11 years old's are. What sort or parents do they think they are as that is child abuse at worst and disgusting irresponsibility at best. Don't you want to give your child the best chance at a long and healthy life?
"""According to the latest figures released by Public Health England, 10.2 per cent of reception pupils in Swindon are obese, compared with 9.3 per cent nationally. By Year 6 – the end of primary school – the figure rises to 19.5 per cent against 18.9 nationally."""" That is absolutely appalling that more than 1 in 10 4 year old's are obese and 2 in 10 11 years old's are. What sort or parents do they think they are as that is child abuse at worst and disgusting irresponsibility at best. Don't you want to give your child the best chance at a long and healthy life? house on the hill
  • Score: 0

8:55am Thu 16 Jan 14

scottwichall says...

Ben said: “In Swindon, stats reflect the national trend, which is that obesity is on the increase. “The emphasis is often on being active, but that’s half of the battle. People have to look at their diet and what they put in their bodies.”

A little snip from Health Survey for England:
"It has been well documented that childhood obesity in the UK has increased significantly since 1995, when 11 per cent of boys and 12 per cent of girls were obese. The prevalence of obesity increased steadily in most years up to around 2004 and 2005, where it peaked at 18 per cent to 19 per cent among both boys and girls. Levels have been slightly lower than this peak in the last few years, with 17 per cent of boys and 16 per cent of girls obese in 2011. The levels in 2012, at 14 per cent for both boys and girls, were lower than in 2011 though not statistically significantly so"

So then Ben.. please check your sources....
Ben said: “In Swindon, stats reflect the national trend, which is that obesity is on the increase. “The emphasis is often on being active, but that’s half of the battle. People have to look at their diet and what they put in their bodies.” A little snip from Health Survey for England: "It has been well documented that childhood obesity in the UK has increased significantly since 1995, when 11 per cent of boys and 12 per cent of girls were obese. The prevalence of obesity increased steadily in most years up to around 2004 and 2005, where it peaked at 18 per cent to 19 per cent among both boys and girls. Levels have been slightly lower than this peak in the last few years, with 17 per cent of boys and 16 per cent of girls obese in 2011. The levels in 2012, at 14 per cent for both boys and girls, were lower than in 2011 though not statistically significantly so" So then Ben.. please check your sources.... scottwichall
  • Score: 1

Comments are closed on this article.

Send us your news, pictures and videos

Most read stories

Local Info

Enter your postcode, town or place name

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree