Swindon AdvertiserGive something up to boost foodbank (From Swindon Advertiser)

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Give something up to boost foodbank

Swindon Advertiser: David Hartridge, Suzan Telles and Gail Mayo launch Swindon Foodbank’s Give Up A Little Something for Lent campaign David Hartridge, Suzan Telles and Gail Mayo launch Swindon Foodbank’s Give Up A Little Something for Lent campaign

A CHARITY is asking people to think about giving up something for Lent and donating the money they save to those in need. The Swindon Foodbank is launching its ‘Give Up a Little Something for Lent’ campaign which it is hoped will raise money to help keep the project running.

Organisers want the townspeople to give something up for Lent, be it sweets or crisps, and then give the Foodbank the money they would have saved at the end of the month.

David Hartridge, project manager, said: “The idea behind it is a simple one. During the period of Lent it’s an opportunity for people to give something up.

“Some people give up something for health reasons and that is great but the thinking behind this is that any money which is saved can be given to the people in Swindon who really need it. For example, if someone gives up a part of their lunch and can save a few pounds each day this can be up to £70 which makes a huge difference to us.”

The aim of this campaign is not to fill up the warehouse but to provide vital funds so the Foodbank can keep on running.

“We are actually in a lucky position in that the warehouse is quite well stocked at this point in time so from that perspective we are okay,” said David.

“What we always need though is cash. We need the money to buy the fuel for our vans and pay our overheads. This is why we would really like it if people could donate using money at the end of the month.

“A lot of people are giving something up at this time of year anyway so it would be great if we could use the money which was saved as it makes such a difference.”

While Christmas and winter is often seen as the busy period for the charity, David is keen to emphasise that demand for their services remains high all year around.

Although there have been a few quiet periods for the Swindon Foodbank recently, usage is continuing to grow each year.

David said: “We are seeing on average a 20 per cent increase in demand year on year. We certainly don’t just provide a festive service but are needed all year around.

“If people can just give us something then it would be very helpful.”

For more information on how to take part in the campaign visit www.swindonfoodbank.co.uk.

Comments (4)

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8:34am Tue 4 Mar 14

house on the hill says...

I would be more inclined to help if I thought it was going to those in real need, but I am not sure it always does. More help needs to be given in the areas of budgeting properly, there are still far too many who dont understand the difference between an essential expense (rent food clothes) and a luxury (alcohol, tobacco mobile phone make up and nail bars etc). Some dont understand, some understand very well and budget carefully and others understand very well and play the system.
I would be more inclined to help if I thought it was going to those in real need, but I am not sure it always does. More help needs to be given in the areas of budgeting properly, there are still far too many who dont understand the difference between an essential expense (rent food clothes) and a luxury (alcohol, tobacco mobile phone make up and nail bars etc). Some dont understand, some understand very well and budget carefully and others understand very well and play the system. house on the hill
  • Score: 6

9:09am Tue 4 Mar 14

swindondad says...

What a wonderful idea,

I will now be taking part.

As to “house on the hills” concerns that some of the resources raised may go to those whom he considers less “deserving” might I say that even if the “head of household” has poor budgeting skills is that any reason their partner or child / children should go hungry?
What a wonderful idea, I will now be taking part. As to “house on the hills” concerns that some of the resources raised may go to those whom he considers less “deserving” might I say that even if the “head of household” has poor budgeting skills is that any reason their partner or child / children should go hungry? swindondad
  • Score: 2

2:02pm Tue 4 Mar 14

house on the hill says...

swindondad wrote:
What a wonderful idea,

I will now be taking part.

As to “house on the hills” concerns that some of the resources raised may go to those whom he considers less “deserving” might I say that even if the “head of household” has poor budgeting skills is that any reason their partner or child / children should go hungry?
That is the dilemma swindondad, but then how do we educate and make parents more responsible without some tough love sometimes. If a parent puts smoking and drinking above feeding their kids, in my eyes they arent fit parents anyway!
[quote][p][bold]swindondad[/bold] wrote: What a wonderful idea, I will now be taking part. As to “house on the hills” concerns that some of the resources raised may go to those whom he considers less “deserving” might I say that even if the “head of household” has poor budgeting skills is that any reason their partner or child / children should go hungry?[/p][/quote]That is the dilemma swindondad, but then how do we educate and make parents more responsible without some tough love sometimes. If a parent puts smoking and drinking above feeding their kids, in my eyes they arent fit parents anyway! house on the hill
  • Score: 3

3:16pm Tue 4 Mar 14

ChannelX says...

I do wish Mr Hartridge would talk in numbers rather than percentages.

As I understand it, the 'increase of 20%' he talks about - and which sounds a lot - actually equates to about 25 people per year.

Around 2 per month.

Out of a town of 210,000 people.

Which is why Mr Hartridge doesn't like to talk in numbers.
I do wish Mr Hartridge would talk in numbers rather than percentages. As I understand it, the 'increase of 20%' he talks about - and which sounds a lot - actually equates to about 25 people per year. Around 2 per month. Out of a town of 210,000 people. Which is why Mr Hartridge doesn't like to talk in numbers. ChannelX
  • Score: 2

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