Swindon AdvertiserHOTSEAT: Send us your questions for Women's Aid director (From Swindon Advertiser)

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HOTSEAT: Send us your questions for Women's Aid director

Swindon Advertiser: HOTSEAT: Send us your questions for Women's Aid director HOTSEAT: Send us your questions for Women's Aid director

SWINDON Women’s Aid director Olwen Kelly will be in the Hotseat next week.

Olwen, who heads a team of 15 paid staff and eight volunteers at the women’s refuge, will be answering all your burning questions.

She was born in County Wicklow, Ireland, to a housewife mum and stonemason dad. The family moved to England in the 1970s and Olwen joined the Civil Service on leaving school at 18.

She worked in Bristol, London and other locations, latterly at the Department of Communities and Local Government, and was South West Regional Crime Advisor and South West Regional Drug Advisor.

In 2007 Olwen joined South Gloucestershire Council, heading up the community safety and drug
team, and last September came the move to her current job at Swindon’s Women’s Refuge.

If you have a question for Olwen, please get in touch.

Email your questions to newsdesk@swindonadvertiser.co.uk under the heading ‘Hotseat’ or leave your comments here.

Alternatively, post your letters to Hotseat, Swindon Advertiser, Newspaper House, 100 Victoria
Road, Swindon, Wiltshire SN1 3BE. You can also send your questions through our Facebook
page, or tweet us @swindonadver. 

The feature will appear in the Adver on Wednesday. Send all questions by Saturday, March 15.

Comments (6)

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12:47pm Wed 12 Mar 14

ChannelX says...

Do you feel the unduly lenient sentences that are routinely handed down to those convicted of domestic abuse have contributed to the increase in the number of such crimes being committed?
Do you feel the unduly lenient sentences that are routinely handed down to those convicted of domestic abuse have contributed to the increase in the number of such crimes being committed? ChannelX
  • Score: 1

12:51pm Wed 12 Mar 14

dukeofM4 says...

What are your comments about Erin Pizzey's position on domestic violence?

For readers unaware about Erin Pizzey, she is the founder of the first shelter for women in the 70s in London for domestic violence and Erin feels the cause was 'hijacked' by the feminist movement and it takes 'two to tango' in a relationship. Erin had to leave the UK for a time in the face of death threats by people who opposed her position.

There are two sides of a coin and under the current climate, domestic violence tends to be gender biased towards women. Do you feel the current direction will ever solve this social problem?
What are your comments about Erin Pizzey's position on domestic violence? For readers unaware about Erin Pizzey, she is the founder of the first shelter for women in the 70s in London for domestic violence and Erin feels the cause was 'hijacked' by the feminist movement and it takes 'two to tango' in a relationship. Erin had to leave the UK for a time in the face of death threats by people who opposed her position. There are two sides of a coin and under the current climate, domestic violence tends to be gender biased towards women. Do you feel the current direction will ever solve this social problem? dukeofM4
  • Score: -3

12:55pm Wed 12 Mar 14

ChannelX says...

What do you think about men who seem to regard any mention of domestic abuse as an attack on them and can only respond by pointing out that, 'it happens to men too'?
What do you think about men who seem to regard any mention of domestic abuse as an attack on them and can only respond by pointing out that, 'it happens to men too'? ChannelX
  • Score: 1

1:52pm Wed 12 Mar 14

BCDR99 says...

How do we get mental and psychological abuse further up in the priorities of many organisations that seem to only respond if there is physical injury to the victim?
How do we get mental and psychological abuse further up in the priorities of many organisations that seem to only respond if there is physical injury to the victim? BCDR99
  • Score: 3

11:41pm Wed 12 Mar 14

madreeves says...

When we think of domestic violence, we tend to think of the "Sleeping with the Enemy" scenario of the younger woman being abused. But there are a lot of women now in their 60s and 70s who married young, stayed at home with the children and depended on the husband to keep them. They grew up in an era where it was acceptable for the husband to have sole control of the household budgets, to be the only one who drove, make all the decisions and keep the wife "in her place" and entirely dependent on him for everything from the roof over her head to a few pounds for some new clothes. Whilst not physical, to many women this is a kind of psychological abuse and, over many years, can take its toll. Many of these wives are deeply unhappy now but have absolutely no idea of how to get out of the situation and be independent. They really don't know any different and stay in loveless, domineering marriages purely because of the fear of the unknown and, bizarrely, of being alone. I have a friend in her 60s who cannot enjoy herself on a day out on her own because, from about midday, her husband is calling and pestering her, repeatedly, demanding "where are you?" "What time will you be back?" "I'm getting hungry, when are you going to get my tea ready?" And she worries because he will sulk and make her life miserable for days as punishment for not coming back on time to make his flippin' tea! (he won't make it himself), so she wants to go home. She can't seem to see how much he controls her life. What single piece of advice would you offer women like this?
When we think of domestic violence, we tend to think of the "Sleeping with the Enemy" scenario of the younger woman being abused. But there are a lot of women now in their 60s and 70s who married young, stayed at home with the children and depended on the husband to keep them. They grew up in an era where it was acceptable for the husband to have sole control of the household budgets, to be the only one who drove, make all the decisions and keep the wife "in her place" and entirely dependent on him for everything from the roof over her head to a few pounds for some new clothes. Whilst not physical, to many women this is a kind of psychological abuse and, over many years, can take its toll. Many of these wives are deeply unhappy now but have absolutely no idea of how to get out of the situation and be independent. They really don't know any different and stay in loveless, domineering marriages purely because of the fear of the unknown and, bizarrely, of being alone. I have a friend in her 60s who cannot enjoy herself on a day out on her own because, from about midday, her husband is calling and pestering her, repeatedly, demanding "where are you?" "What time will you be back?" "I'm getting hungry, when are you going to get my tea ready?" And she worries because he will sulk and make her life miserable for days as punishment for not coming back on time to make his flippin' tea! (he won't make it himself), so she wants to go home. She can't seem to see how much he controls her life. What single piece of advice would you offer women like this? madreeves
  • Score: 2

10:15pm Thu 13 Mar 14

dukeofM4 says...

Only five comments, there seems to be a total lack of interest in 'In the Hot Seat' if not the issues at hand.
Only five comments, there seems to be a total lack of interest in 'In the Hot Seat' if not the issues at hand. dukeofM4
  • Score: 0

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