Medics’ work praised

The Bereavement Services team, who won the Compassion In Practice award at Great Western Hospital Staff Excellence Awards

The Bereavement Services team, who won the Compassion In Practice award at Great Western Hospital Staff Excellence Awards

First published in News by

THE efforts of staff to deliver exemplary care to all patients in Swindon and beyond were recognised at the Great Western Hospital’s annual excellence awards.

For the fifth year running the successes of doctors, nurses, midwives and others were celebrated at a Rio carnival-themed ceremony at the Steam Museum, which saw outstanding teams and individuals scoop one of eight coveted accolades.

Among the winners were the Emergency Department team, who were awarded the Team Of The Year trophy for their ability to adapt and even improve patient experience in spite of a large refurbishment project at the unit.

Clinical lead matron Annette Baskerville said: “It is lovely to win this award and have recognition for all the hard work that the whole team put in through those difficult months.

“The refurbishment work last year meant that we had to shut parts of the department but the team made sure that patient safety was always maintained.” The Compassion In Practice Award was won by the Bereavement Services team at GWH, a group of four women with one of the most emotionally challenging jobs in the trust.

Bereavement Services manager Samantha Cunningham said: “I feel so proud as a manager that my team of girls were nominated. “We work behind the scenes a lot of the time, so the majority of people do not understand the role of our department. “My team will always go that extra mile to make the bereavement process as easy as possible for the grieving family.

The People’s Choice Award, voted for by patients across the trust, was handed to Fiona Robinson, a physiotherapist at Malmesbury Primary Care Centre.

More than 400 health practitioners, from doctors and nurses to midwives and community dentists, attended the ceremony in a show of support for their shortlisted colleagues.

The awards, which were first hosted in 2010, were set up to recognise exemplary service and care across Swindon and Wiltshire.

Nerissa Vaughan, chief executive of the Great Western Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust Board, said: “These awards are an opportunity for us to really say a big thank you to all our fantastic staff who have gone that extra mile. “Working in a busy NHS trust, we don’t always get the chance to stop and reflect on the difference our staff make. I am fully aware how hard they work so their continuing dedication is something that deserves to be celebrated.”

Comments (3)

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3:00pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

Good job they didn’t invite me, I could have pointed them in the direction of quiet a few widows who are still traumatised by the way their loved ones and they were treated whilst at this filthy house of death.

They certainly didn’t ask the public what they thought.

And self-praise has no merit what so ever.

The police do it every year:- here you are Charlie have a medal for doing your job and a certificate to show your mates.

What a load of boll*o,s.

This is what your good for, ringing an agency and getting someone to do what your paid to do.

NHS spends £2.6 BILLION paying agency staff up to £160 an hour to help struggling departments
Hospitals are hiring agency nurses for as much as £160 per hour
In one Kent hospital, locum doctors were paid £1,000 each for a single shift
Agency workers can be up to 30 per cent more expensive than permanent staff, hiring agency staff in the NHS is a 'false economy'

AND this.

TELL US YOUR NOT DOING THE SAME:------ YOU ARE
Good job they didn’t invite me, I could have pointed them in the direction of quiet a few widows who are still traumatised by the way their loved ones and they were treated whilst at this filthy house of death. They certainly didn’t ask the public what they thought. And self-praise has no merit what so ever. The police do it every year:- here you are Charlie have a medal for doing your job and a certificate to show your mates. What a load of boll*o,s. This is what your good for, ringing an agency and getting someone to do what your paid to do. NHS spends £2.6 BILLION paying agency staff up to £160 an hour to help struggling departments Hospitals are hiring agency nurses for as much as £160 per hour In one Kent hospital, locum doctors were paid £1,000 each for a single shift Agency workers can be up to 30 per cent more expensive than permanent staff, hiring agency staff in the NHS is a 'false economy' AND this. TELL US YOUR NOT DOING THE SAME:------ YOU ARE anotherimigrant
  • Score: 2

3:02pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

NHS trust chairman handed £190,000 in pay and expenses for working as little as one day a week
Christopher Langley appointed chairman of Medway Foundation Trust
Troubled hospital put into special measures after concerns on patient care
Paid £12,000+VAT each month, plus another 10% in expenses
He must devote 'sufficient time' to role, average of 'one or two days a week'
NHS trust chairman handed £190,000 in pay and expenses for working as little as one day a week Christopher Langley appointed chairman of Medway Foundation Trust Troubled hospital put into special measures after concerns on patient care Paid £12,000+VAT each month, plus another 10% in expenses He must devote 'sufficient time' to role, average of 'one or two days a week' anotherimigrant
  • Score: 1

3:29pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

One of Britain's most senior policewomen has retired at 50, just months after a lucrative promotion that may have added an extra £450,000 to her pension pot.

Sharon Rowe used to earn about £100,000-a-year as an Assistant Chief Constable with West Midlands Police - but was chosen over three colleagues for the £140,000 Deputy Chief Constable role in November last year.

Police have the right to retire after 30 years service, so just seven months after her promotion Ms Rowe left her job on Sunday aged 50.

Today it was revealed her last promotion could have boosted her future pension payouts by an astonishing £456,773 by the time she reaches the age of 82.

That includes a potential tax-free lump sum bonus of £83,493 because police pensions are based on an officer's final year salary.

The revelations have caused a stir within West Midlands Police - which has seen pay freezes and job reductions as it faces cuts of almost £150million.

It also comes less than a year before pay reforms which will see police pensions based on average career earnings rather than a final salary figure.
One of Britain's most senior policewomen has retired at 50, just months after a lucrative promotion that may have added an extra £450,000 to her pension pot. Sharon Rowe used to earn about £100,000-a-year as an Assistant Chief Constable with West Midlands Police - but was chosen over three colleagues for the £140,000 Deputy Chief Constable role in November last year. Police have the right to retire after 30 years service, so just seven months after her promotion Ms Rowe left her job on Sunday aged 50. Today it was revealed her last promotion could have boosted her future pension payouts by an astonishing £456,773 by the time she reaches the age of 82. That includes a potential tax-free lump sum bonus of £83,493 because police pensions are based on an officer's final year salary. The revelations have caused a stir within West Midlands Police - which has seen pay freezes and job reductions as it faces cuts of almost £150million. It also comes less than a year before pay reforms which will see police pensions based on average career earnings rather than a final salary figure. anotherimigrant
  • Score: 4

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