GWH plans ahead for a winter surge

Dr Elizabeth Price from GWH, who is one of those helping to plan for the increase in patients likely to occur over winter

Dr Elizabeth Price from GWH, who is one of those helping to plan for the increase in patients likely to occur over winter

First published in News by

ALL hands are already on deck at the Great Western Hospital to help staff cope with an expected surge in A&E admissions over the winter.

Last year was the most challenging winter on record for the hospital, which saw 27,565 people attend A&E between October and December, with 4,941 emergency admissions.

Overall admissions increased by four per cent in 2013-2014 .

A total of 7,041 patients have been to A&E since the start of April, and an array of new measures are being explored to cope with ever-growing demand this winter.

So far 138 new nurses and midwives have been recruited, as well as three consultants and 12 extra nurses for the emergency department. Two care for the elderly consultants will also join the hospital in September.

The A&E department was also refurbished last year and its capacity was increased.

“It has got busier across the NHS as a whole and we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,” said Dr Liz Price, the associate medical director for unscheduled care at GWH. “And Swindon is growing faster than the surrounding area. “The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this.

“We anticipate a busy winter and we are working hard to make sure we have staff in place to support that.

“The Emergency Department is a much better working environment and we have more capacity.”

The hospital launched the ambulatory service three years ago to allow emergency patients to bypass A&E altogether, if they are referred. The emergency department staff can also simply transfer patients to the day service for care. This has already helped to ease pressure on A&E and the hospital is hoping to increase the number of patients seen by the service from about 20 to 35 a day.

An Urgent Care Centre is also available at the hospital for people unable to make an appointment with their GP.

Last year £102.4m was spent by the Clinical Commissioning Group, which buys health services for Swindon, on GWH and a further £1.2m Government grant was given to the town to ease winter pressures. A new bid for additional funding for the coming winter is about to be made .

The CCG is also on the verge of piloting SUCCESS centres, or acute GP walk-ins, ahead of winter to offer increased acute care in the community.

Gill May, an executive nurse at the CCG said the body would take every possible step to meet increased demand for treatment this winter.

She said: “During the last winter, NHS Swindon Clinical Commissioning Group commissioned a number of schemes to improve patient care and reduce the pressure on the health service locally such as the urgent GP/nurse centre at Great Western Hospitals, and the children’s health clinic at Carfax Medical Centre.

“Such schemes maintained the level of emergency attendances in the normal range of 120-150 a day during the winter peak months, by seeing over 500 patients a month who would otherwise have gone to the emergency department.”

Comments (11)

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9:35am Mon 23 Jun 14

Oik1 says...

You can see this years Winter headlines already,
GWH struggling to cope with extra numbers of elderly due to bad weather, you just know that's the way it's going to be, the hospital is not big enough, it cannot cope, if we had some honesty from the hospitals management over the number of times the hospital was completely full in the Winter just past it would be a start, but no, everything was fine and they coped, really?
Tell that to those left waiting in the A&E area for 6 to 8 hours after being seen as there was nowhere for them to be moved to, patients moved to normaly unused rooms and those extra patients squeezed into wards designed for 4 people with no extra staff to deal with them.
You can see this years Winter headlines already, GWH struggling to cope with extra numbers of elderly due to bad weather, you just know that's the way it's going to be, the hospital is not big enough, it cannot cope, if we had some honesty from the hospitals management over the number of times the hospital was completely full in the Winter just past it would be a start, but no, everything was fine and they coped, really? Tell that to those left waiting in the A&E area for 6 to 8 hours after being seen as there was nowhere for them to be moved to, patients moved to normaly unused rooms and those extra patients squeezed into wards designed for 4 people with no extra staff to deal with them. Oik1
  • Score: 0

11:50am Mon 23 Jun 14

Hmmmf says...

The summer solstice was two days ago, nights are drawing in now. Time to get the winter scaremongering underway.
The summer solstice was two days ago, nights are drawing in now. Time to get the winter scaremongering underway. Hmmmf
  • Score: 6

2:22pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

They cant cope now, never mind whats going to happen in 15wks time when the first frost happens.
They cant cope now, never mind whats going to happen in 15wks time when the first frost happens. anotherimigrant
  • Score: 2

3:43pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

Give yourseves a medal and a certificate for this girls.

And when I bring a patient to your filthy hospital/place of work, tell me your under resouced and have no money.


Health groups have condemned the huge deal, worth enough to pay for more than eight nurses.

The health watchdog Monitor appointed Mr Langley in February after the hospital trusts was found to have higher-than-expected death rates and failing on patient safety.

The one-year initial contract sets out how he is paid through a company, Trust and West Easton Consulting Ltd, of which he is a director.

He receives £14,400 in pay each month, plus expenses worth 10 per cent of his salary, at £1,440. Over a year it is worth £190,080. By comparison, Mr Langley’s predecessor received just £40,000 to £45,000.

NHS spends £2.6 BILLION paying agency staff up to £160 an hour to help struggling departments

The revelations come after figures from the Royal College of GPs showed that one in six of all consultations last year – some 47 million appointments –involved a wait of at least a week to see a doctor or nurse.

A snapshot survey by this newspaper has found:
A long-serving doctor at a surgery branded dangerous by the NHS watchdog spends his evenings taking orders at a curry house .
A GP takes three weeks away from her patients every year to act as the official doctor at the Wimbledon tennis tournament.
One doctor can make thousands of pounds a week at his Harley Street clinic while his NHS patients have to wait for up to a month to be seen.
Two GPs from a South London NHS practice rated as ‘abysmal’ work privately for a 24-hour callout service that charges up to £250 for home visits.


In struggling NHS A&E departments, locum doctors are being paid in excess of £1,000 per shift while consultants received more than £3,000 and nurses up to £1,600

GPs are being paid nearly £1,500 a shift to work nights and weekends in crisis-hit A&E units.

Four in ten casualty departments are hiring family doctors – already paid an average £104,000 a year – to help deal with the soaring numbers of patients.

The figures emerged on the day doctors came under fire for suggesting that patients should be charged up to £10 a visit to a casualty unit to deter those who do not need to be there.
Give yourseves a medal and a certificate for this girls. And when I bring a patient to your filthy hospital/place of work, tell me your under resouced and have no money. Health groups have condemned the huge deal, worth enough to pay for more than eight nurses. The health watchdog Monitor appointed Mr Langley in February after the hospital trusts was found to have higher-than-expected death rates and failing on patient safety. The one-year initial contract sets out how he is paid through a company, Trust and West Easton Consulting Ltd, of which he is a director. He receives £14,400 in pay each month, plus expenses worth 10 per cent of his salary, at £1,440. Over a year it is worth £190,080. By comparison, Mr Langley’s predecessor received just £40,000 to £45,000. NHS spends £2.6 BILLION paying agency staff up to £160 an hour to help struggling departments The revelations come after figures from the Royal College of GPs showed that one in six of all consultations last year – some 47 million appointments –involved a wait of at least a week to see a doctor or nurse. A snapshot survey by this newspaper has found: A long-serving doctor at a surgery branded dangerous by the NHS watchdog spends his evenings taking orders at a curry house . A GP takes three weeks away from her patients every year to act as the official doctor at the Wimbledon tennis tournament. One doctor can make thousands of pounds a week at his Harley Street clinic while his NHS patients have to wait for up to a month to be seen. Two GPs from a South London NHS practice rated as ‘abysmal’ work privately for a 24-hour callout service that charges up to £250 for home visits. In struggling NHS A&E departments, locum doctors are being paid in excess of £1,000 per shift while consultants received more than £3,000 and nurses up to £1,600 GPs are being paid nearly £1,500 a shift to work nights and weekends in crisis-hit A&E units. Four in ten casualty departments are hiring family doctors – already paid an average £104,000 a year – to help deal with the soaring numbers of patients. The figures emerged on the day doctors came under fire for suggesting that patients should be charged up to £10 a visit to a casualty unit to deter those who do not need to be there. anotherimigrant
  • Score: 1

4:28pm Mon 23 Jun 14

Hmmmf says...

Dr Liz Price proclaimed:
...we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,”

The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this.

The more I think about this, the more it appears to me to be discriminatory and offensive ageism from an NHS with an increasingly poor record of its treatment for elderly patients.

Only 21.9% of A&E admissions at GWH in 2012/2013 were aged 60 or over.
Which of course means 78.1% of all admissions were under 60.

Official recorded age groups for A&E admissions at GWH 2012/2013:
0-9, 15.4%
10-19, 14.6%
20-29, 15%
30-39, 11.5%
40-49, 12.2%
59-59, 9.5%
60-69, 7.7%
70-79, 6.7%
80-89, 5.8%
90+ 1.7%

Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Hospital Episode Statistics for England, Accident and Emergency (A&E) statistics, 2012-13.
Which Dr Liz Price should be intimately familiar with.
[quote][p][bold]Dr Liz Price[/bold] proclaimed: ...we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,” The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this. [/quote] The more I think about this, the more it appears to me to be discriminatory and offensive ageism from an NHS with an increasingly poor record of its treatment for elderly patients. Only 21.9% of A&E admissions at GWH in 2012/2013 were aged 60 or over. Which of course means 78.1% of all admissions were under 60. Official recorded age groups for A&E admissions at GWH 2012/2013: 0-9, 15.4% 10-19, 14.6% 20-29, 15% 30-39, 11.5% 40-49, 12.2% 59-59, 9.5% 60-69, 7.7% 70-79, 6.7% 80-89, 5.8% 90+ 1.7% Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Hospital Episode Statistics for England, Accident and Emergency (A&E) statistics, 2012-13. Which Dr Liz Price should be intimately familiar with. Hmmmf
  • Score: 4

4:48pm Mon 23 Jun 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

Hmmmf wrote:
Dr Liz Price proclaimed:
...we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,”

The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this.

The more I think about this, the more it appears to me to be discriminatory and offensive ageism from an NHS with an increasingly poor record of its treatment for elderly patients.

Only 21.9% of A&E admissions at GWH in 2012/2013 were aged 60 or over.
Which of course means 78.1% of all admissions were under 60.

Official recorded age groups for A&E admissions at GWH 2012/2013:
0-9, 15.4%
10-19, 14.6%
20-29, 15%
30-39, 11.5%
40-49, 12.2%
59-59, 9.5%
60-69, 7.7%
70-79, 6.7%
80-89, 5.8%
90+ 1.7%

Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Hospital Episode Statistics for England, Accident and Emergency (A&E) statistics, 2012-13.
Which Dr Liz Price should be intimately familiar with.
Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.
[quote][p][bold]Hmmmf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dr Liz Price[/bold] proclaimed: ...we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,” The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this. [/quote] The more I think about this, the more it appears to me to be discriminatory and offensive ageism from an NHS with an increasingly poor record of its treatment for elderly patients. Only 21.9% of A&E admissions at GWH in 2012/2013 were aged 60 or over. Which of course means 78.1% of all admissions were under 60. Official recorded age groups for A&E admissions at GWH 2012/2013: 0-9, 15.4% 10-19, 14.6% 20-29, 15% 30-39, 11.5% 40-49, 12.2% 59-59, 9.5% 60-69, 7.7% 70-79, 6.7% 80-89, 5.8% 90+ 1.7% Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Hospital Episode Statistics for England, Accident and Emergency (A&E) statistics, 2012-13. Which Dr Liz Price should be intimately familiar with.[/p][/quote]Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E. The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: -4

5:28pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Hmmmf wrote:
Dr Liz Price proclaimed:
...we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,”

The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this.

The more I think about this, the more it appears to me to be discriminatory and offensive ageism from an NHS with an increasingly poor record of its treatment for elderly patients.

Only 21.9% of A&E admissions at GWH in 2012/2013 were aged 60 or over.
Which of course means 78.1% of all admissions were under 60.

Official recorded age groups for A&E admissions at GWH 2012/2013:
0-9, 15.4%
10-19, 14.6%
20-29, 15%
30-39, 11.5%
40-49, 12.2%
59-59, 9.5%
60-69, 7.7%
70-79, 6.7%
80-89, 5.8%
90+ 1.7%

Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Hospital Episode Statistics for England, Accident and Emergency (A&E) statistics, 2012-13.
Which Dr Liz Price should be intimately familiar with.
Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.
And why is this????

Didnt we all complain when this filthy house of death was proposed that
A It wouldnt be big enough
B the car park was to small.
C this is for you to fill out
D this is for you to fill out.

When I was in there the only old person was given an opiat overdose and moved out to die, and she died.

All others just sat and waited for someone to either visit or take some blood.
That and the used dressings and urine everywere and naked people not being taken care of, made a thouroughly depressing site.

More akin to the Crimean war, more died through negligence and ignorance than the war.
[quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Hmmmf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Dr Liz Price[/bold] proclaimed: ...we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,” The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. The UK as a whole has been slow in keeping up with this. [/quote] The more I think about this, the more it appears to me to be discriminatory and offensive ageism from an NHS with an increasingly poor record of its treatment for elderly patients. Only 21.9% of A&E admissions at GWH in 2012/2013 were aged 60 or over. Which of course means 78.1% of all admissions were under 60. Official recorded age groups for A&E admissions at GWH 2012/2013: 0-9, 15.4% 10-19, 14.6% 20-29, 15% 30-39, 11.5% 40-49, 12.2% 59-59, 9.5% 60-69, 7.7% 70-79, 6.7% 80-89, 5.8% 90+ 1.7% Source: The Health and Social Care Information Centre, Hospital Episode Statistics for England, Accident and Emergency (A&E) statistics, 2012-13. Which Dr Liz Price should be intimately familiar with.[/p][/quote]Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.[/p][/quote]And why is this???? Didnt we all complain when this filthy house of death was proposed that A It wouldnt be big enough B the car park was to small. C this is for you to fill out D this is for you to fill out. When I was in there the only old person was given an opiat overdose and moved out to die, and she died. All others just sat and waited for someone to either visit or take some blood. That and the used dressings and urine everywere and naked people not being taken care of, made a thouroughly depressing site. More akin to the Crimean war, more died through negligence and ignorance than the war. anotherimigrant
  • Score: -1

5:40pm Mon 23 Jun 14

anotherimigrant says...

The A&E department was also refurbished last year and its capacity was increased.

“It has got busier across the NHS as a whole and we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,” said Dr Liz Price, the associate medical director for unscheduled care at GWH. “And Swindon is growing faster than the surrounding area. “The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses.


"""""""No you think so, old people, wonder where they came from.

Pity you weren’t around fifty years ago Liz, your mum and dad could have told you.

But they don’t have to wait to see a doctor do they?""""""""

. .
“We anticipate a busy winter and we are working hard to make sure we have staff in place to support that.

“The Emergency Department is a much better working environment and we have more capacity.”


"""" Nice environment for the staff, you should come in the front door with me Liz and see the people queuing out the door with their hands and feet hanging of, the front desk staff only work one at a time, at their own speed, SLOOOOOWLY, and the doctors can only see one person at a time.

Is this the cr*ap they feed you on in the staff room, "tell everyone it’s all right"

Get a life Liz, come and meet the real victims of the LOCAL health service inadequacies.

Better still can someone at the EA tell Liz to read these columns.
The A&E department was also refurbished last year and its capacity was increased. “It has got busier across the NHS as a whole and we have an aging population across the UK and a growing population,” said Dr Liz Price, the associate medical director for unscheduled care at GWH. “And Swindon is growing faster than the surrounding area. “The other issue is that older people are living longer and are living with chronic medical illnesses. """""""No you think so, old people, wonder where they came from. Pity you weren’t around fifty years ago Liz, your mum and dad could have told you. But they don’t have to wait to see a doctor do they?"""""""" . . “We anticipate a busy winter and we are working hard to make sure we have staff in place to support that. “The Emergency Department is a much better working environment and we have more capacity.” """" Nice environment for the staff, you should come in the front door with me Liz and see the people queuing out the door with their hands and feet hanging of, the front desk staff only work one at a time, at their own speed, SLOOOOOWLY, and the doctors can only see one person at a time. Is this the cr*ap they feed you on in the staff room, "tell everyone it’s all right" Get a life Liz, come and meet the real victims of the LOCAL health service inadequacies. Better still can someone at the EA tell Liz to read these columns. anotherimigrant
  • Score: 0

7:45pm Mon 23 Jun 14

Hmmmf says...

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.

The article is entirely about A&E, and not about admissions to wards or inpatient appointments, nor is it about referrals to GPs or any other recorded form of discharge from A&E.
Nationally, only 20.8% of all patients attending A&E are subsequently admitted to hospital and GWH is no exception. Nor are they expecting any significant increase in that number this year.
[quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.[/quote] The article is entirely about A&E, and not about admissions to wards or inpatient appointments, nor is it about referrals to GPs or any other recorded form of discharge from A&E. Nationally, only 20.8% of all patients attending A&E are subsequently admitted to hospital and GWH is no exception. Nor are they expecting any significant increase in that number this year. Hmmmf
  • Score: 2

8:22pm Mon 23 Jun 14

Hmmmf says...

As another noted previously:
Adver Nov 2013 wrote:
A TOTAL of £4.4 million has been invested in optimising health care in Swindon to reduce patients waiting times and free up much-needed hospital beds as the town braces itself for one of most relentless winters the NHS has experienced.

Swindon Clinical Commissioning Group, which is in charge of buying health services in town and Shrivenham, has pooled resources to make sure it is able to cope with growing pressure to increase capacity as an extra 578 people are expected to be admitted to hospital every month.

That obviously worked then.
http://goo.gl/5D2xvG
As another noted previously: [quote][p][bold]Adver Nov 2013[/bold] wrote: A TOTAL of £4.4 million has been invested in optimising health care in Swindon to reduce patients waiting times and free up much-needed hospital beds as the town braces itself for one of most relentless winters the NHS has experienced. Swindon Clinical Commissioning Group, which is in charge of buying health services in town and Shrivenham, has pooled resources to make sure it is able to cope with growing pressure to increase capacity as an extra 578 people are expected to be admitted to hospital every month. [/quote] That obviously worked then. http://goo.gl/5D2xvG Hmmmf
  • Score: 3

10:36am Tue 24 Jun 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

Hmmmf wrote:
The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.

The article is entirely about A&E, and not about admissions to wards or inpatient appointments, nor is it about referrals to GPs or any other recorded form of discharge from A&E.
Nationally, only 20.8% of all patients attending A&E are subsequently admitted to hospital and GWH is no exception. Nor are they expecting any significant increase in that number this year.
So if the wards are all full up, where are those 20.8% of people to be admitted supposed to go? The two are intrinsically linked.

However, I don't really understand why this last winter caused such an upsurge in patients, it was one of the mildest winters on record!
[quote][p][bold]Hmmmf[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: Yes but it's not just A&E you need to consider, it's also the number of people admitted to hospital wards and inpatient appointments too. If all the wards are full up with old people, there is nowhere to go for people in A&E that need to be admitted. This leads to backlogs and long waiting times in A&E.[/quote] The article is entirely about A&E, and not about admissions to wards or inpatient appointments, nor is it about referrals to GPs or any other recorded form of discharge from A&E. Nationally, only 20.8% of all patients attending A&E are subsequently admitted to hospital and GWH is no exception. Nor are they expecting any significant increase in that number this year.[/p][/quote]So if the wards are all full up, where are those 20.8% of people to be admitted supposed to go? The two are intrinsically linked. However, I don't really understand why this last winter caused such an upsurge in patients, it was one of the mildest winters on record! The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 1

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