Careless walkers put cattle in peril

Richard Green with cattle that escaped after the gate was left open by walkers

Richard Green with cattle that escaped after the gate was left open by walkers

First published in News
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CATTLE had to be rescued from sewage sludge after their herd was allowed to escape from their field by ramblers who left a gate open.

Now farmer Richard Green is warning walkers to take more care.

The herd made its way half a mile from Rectory Farm in Idstone, while workers scrambled to retrieve them. Two became stuck in a stockpile of sewage sludge close to the Ridgeway.

The stricken 500kg animals had to be winched to safety.

Mr Green wants to trace the organisers of the walk that passed through his land on the morning of July 10.

He had to follow events from Sweden, where he was travelling at the time.

“The message came through to me, while I was away, from the tenants of a house we let out close to the footpath,” he said. “The path is high up on the downs, so it is in quite an isolated position.

“They told me that the cattle were roaming free across the corn fields because the gate had been left open.”

Helpers and neighbours stepped in to track down the cattle, finding two in distress after they became stuck.

“From where they were meant to be, they had travelled maybe half a mile,” Mr Green said. “The animals went through the crust of this stockpile of sewage sludge and went on for a while until they had to stop. There was no way they were going to get out. They weigh between 400 and 500 kilos each, so while our men were able to walk over the top of the pile to attach a halter, the animals had just sunk. They walked right into the middle of it.

“With young beef animals is if you can put a halter around the head behind the ears you can then pull it without harming it.

“They put a halter around its head and to that attached a wagon strap. They drove into the middle of this heap with a telescopic handler and were able to pull the animal back by winding in the handler.”

Richard wants to contact the organisers of the walk, but has no indication of where they were from.

“They were in a lot of groups of about five or six, and each group were opening and shutting the gate behind them,” he said. “They had some hefty backpacks on and all seemed quite young.

“What should happen in a strung out walk like that is you have one person at the front and one person at the back taking responsibility, or have one person shout back at the others to ensure the gate is shut.

“There were 42 animals in that field, and they were what farmers call stirks — growing beef animals between one and two years old.

“I could not get back to help as I was in Sweden, but I have got helpers who got there as soon as they could, and someone on a neighbouring farm went out as well.

“One of our men took the picture of one of the animals being pulled out and sent it to us — it was quite dramatic. All the animals are safe back on the farm now.”

  • Anyone who was a member of the group or organised the walk can contact Richard on 07788727811.

Comments (13)

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8:52am Wed 16 Jul 14

The Jockster says...

Dominic - you need to understand the difference between "heard" as in "I heard the birds singing" and "herd" as in " I saw a herd of cattle" :)
Dominic - you need to understand the difference between "heard" as in "I heard the birds singing" and "herd" as in " I saw a herd of cattle" :) The Jockster
  • Score: 8

9:38am Wed 16 Jul 14

Vulcan1 says...

Give him a chance Jockster, this is the Adver after all ; spelling and punctuation don't matter!!!!
Give him a chance Jockster, this is the Adver after all ; spelling and punctuation don't matter!!!! Vulcan1
  • Score: 3

10:13am Wed 16 Jul 14

The Real Librarian says...

The Jockster wrote:
Dominic - you need to understand the difference between "heard" as in "I heard the birds singing" and "herd" as in " I saw a herd of cattle" :)
Maybe Cows should be seen and not herd!
[quote][p][bold]The Jockster[/bold] wrote: Dominic - you need to understand the difference between "heard" as in "I heard the birds singing" and "herd" as in " I saw a herd of cattle" :)[/p][/quote]Maybe Cows should be seen and not herd! The Real Librarian
  • Score: 2

10:17am Wed 16 Jul 14

adsinibiza says...

Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it adsinibiza
  • Score: -13

11:43am Wed 16 Jul 14

Chrisg46 says...

adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
[quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants. Chrisg46
  • Score: 4

11:46am Wed 16 Jul 14

PJC says...

Townies...
Townies... PJC
  • Score: -1

1:10pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Al Smith says...

Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
People think a right of way means they can use an entire field.

No one learns the countryside code anymore.

Dog walkers let their animals wander free and bother livestock and then cry foul when the farmer legally shoots their dog.

We're a nation of rights and no responsibilities!
[quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.[/p][/quote]People think a right of way means they can use an entire field. No one learns the countryside code anymore. Dog walkers let their animals wander free and bother livestock and then cry foul when the farmer legally shoots their dog. We're a nation of rights and no responsibilities! Al Smith
  • Score: 4

1:21pm Wed 16 Jul 14

adsinibiza says...

Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public
[quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.[/p][/quote]I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public adsinibiza
  • Score: -8

1:25pm Wed 16 Jul 14

house on the hill says...

Al Smith wrote:
Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
People think a right of way means they can use an entire field.

No one learns the countryside code anymore.

Dog walkers let their animals wander free and bother livestock and then cry foul when the farmer legally shoots their dog.

We're a nation of rights and no responsibilities!
Absolutely spot on. I remember about 10 years ago one of the few sensible things a politician said was "Everyone knows their rights, but no one know or cares about heir responsibilities". We live in a complete double standards society where we expect others to live to a higher code than we think we need to. Just spend half an hour on the roads and you know that to be true!!!!
[quote][p][bold]Al Smith[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.[/p][/quote]People think a right of way means they can use an entire field. No one learns the countryside code anymore. Dog walkers let their animals wander free and bother livestock and then cry foul when the farmer legally shoots their dog. We're a nation of rights and no responsibilities![/p][/quote]Absolutely spot on. I remember about 10 years ago one of the few sensible things a politician said was "Everyone knows their rights, but no one know or cares about heir responsibilities". We live in a complete double standards society where we expect others to live to a higher code than we think we need to. Just spend half an hour on the roads and you know that to be true!!!! house on the hill
  • Score: 5

1:46pm Wed 16 Jul 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

adsinibiza wrote:
Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public
Yup, precisely. People and scared 400kg animals don't generally mix too well. Would the farmer be complaining so much if one of his cows had trampled someone using a legitimate public right of way?

Maybe the walkers thought they had closed the gate - for all we know the gate may not have been closed properly because the gate was in poor condition, as is the case with many gates across rural public paths. I've lost count of the number I've had to untie/tie up using bailing twine! As an aside, perhaps he could put in a stile or kissing gate instead?
[quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.[/p][/quote]I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public[/p][/quote]Yup, precisely. People and scared 400kg animals don't generally mix too well. Would the farmer be complaining so much if one of his cows had trampled someone using a legitimate public right of way? Maybe the walkers thought they had closed the gate - for all we know the gate may not have been closed properly because the gate was in poor condition, as is the case with many gates across rural public paths. I've lost count of the number I've had to untie/tie up using bailing twine! As an aside, perhaps he could put in a stile or kissing gate instead? The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: -4

3:00pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Chrisg46 says...

adsinibiza wrote:
Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public
But the issue isnt the safety of ramblers crossing the field, its ramblers (presumably) not leaving the field in the way it was found.
I do take on board the Artists point re poorly maintained gates etc - it is entirely possible that a gate was not secured properly and the curious cows wondered out.
[quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.[/p][/quote]I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public[/p][/quote]But the issue isnt the safety of ramblers crossing the field, its ramblers (presumably) not leaving the field in the way it was found. I do take on board the Artists point re poorly maintained gates etc - it is entirely possible that a gate was not secured properly and the curious cows wondered out. Chrisg46
  • Score: 0

3:27pm Wed 16 Jul 14

adsinibiza says...

Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Chrisg46 wrote:
adsinibiza wrote:
Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it
its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.
I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public
But the issue isnt the safety of ramblers crossing the field, its ramblers (presumably) not leaving the field in the way it was found.
I do take on board the Artists point re poorly maintained gates etc - it is entirely possible that a gate was not secured properly and the curious cows wondered out.
I would agree that one should always leave 'the field in the way it was found' but in this instance one does have to ask if these particular animals should have been in that particular field in the first place given the risks they would pose to the safety of walkers using the right of way
[quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Chrisg46[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]adsinibiza[/bold] wrote: Sounds like duke of Edinburgh award people to me. Mind you one has to ask what the farmer is doing putting animals like that in a field that has a public footpath going through it[/p][/quote]its his field, surely he can do what he likes with it. It is up to the ramblers to keep the field contained in this instance, its like Countryside 101. If i was the organiser of this event, i would be looking to have harsh words with the participants.[/p][/quote]I would disagree - if a field has a public right of way accross it then I would argue that the farmer also has a responsibility to those that use that right of way to keep them safe. In my opinion based upon my experiences out walking a group of young male cattle can be over inquisitive and aggressive and are therefore unsuitable to be kept in a field with a public right of way running through it. In recent weeks I have had to go out of my way on two occasions as a result of such groups - once by clambering over fences into neighbouring fields and once by a two mile diversion. Yes I know some walkers can be irresponsible with dogs, gates etc but responsibility is a two way thing. Farmers have a responsibility to ensure the safety of people legitimately using public rights of way across their land which includes not keeping animals which can and on occasion do seriously injure and kill members of the public[/p][/quote]But the issue isnt the safety of ramblers crossing the field, its ramblers (presumably) not leaving the field in the way it was found. I do take on board the Artists point re poorly maintained gates etc - it is entirely possible that a gate was not secured properly and the curious cows wondered out.[/p][/quote]I would agree that one should always leave 'the field in the way it was found' but in this instance one does have to ask if these particular animals should have been in that particular field in the first place given the risks they would pose to the safety of walkers using the right of way adsinibiza
  • Score: 1

3:59pm Wed 16 Jul 14

Chrisg46 says...

Considering the number of fields that have public rights of way compared to the numbers killed in cow stampedes every year, that risk seems to be fairly minimal.
Considering the number of fields that have public rights of way compared to the numbers killed in cow stampedes every year, that risk seems to be fairly minimal. Chrisg46
  • Score: 3

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