Firefighters plan a new week of strikes

Firefighters at Drove Station during a strike last month

Firefighters at Drove Station during a strike last month

First published in News by

FIREFIGHTERS will walk out again next week in a string of strikes against Government plans to raise the retirement age and change their pensions.

The latest series of strikes to take place in the ongoing bitter dispute between the Fire Brigades Union and the Government is set to take place over eight consecutive days.

From Saturday, August 9, until August 16, union members will walk out between the hours of noon and 2pm and 10.59pm and 11.59pm each day.

It is expected that firefighters from all of Swindon’s fire stations, including Stratton and Westlea will take part.

Wiltshire FBU secretary Brent Thorley said: “It’s quite disruptive and it means that a lot of work has to go in to any plans to cover during the strike, which we hope will be fed back to the MPs and back to central Government.

“It’s just a tactic to have maximum impact on the powers that be but minimum impact to the public.

“We thought there might not be any more action for a little while because the new fire officer was being appointed.

“But that action is being taken so soon after the last one means that the Government hasn’t changed it’s position.

“I think the public have got to understand that we are only doing this because we’re hitting a brick wall.

“All we want are proper, constructive talks with the Government and that just hasn’t happened yet.

“But we’re open to talks and would stop strike action even before we started if they sat down and talked constructively with us.”

Once again Wiltshire Fire And Rescue has put contingency plans in place to deal with the impending industrial action to maintain emergency cover across county.

Cover will include a number of crews responding to emergency calls from alternative locations, and on-call stations unaffected by the strike will also be providing an emergency response as usual on all strike dates.

Chief Fire Officer Simon Routh-Jones said: “As on previous occasions, we will have reduced resources during these strike periods.

“We will respond to 999 calls, but it may take us a little longer than usual to arrive.”

Wiltshire Fire And Rescue has also issued advice to the public in a bid to help them remain safe during the period of strike action.

These include ensuring that they install working smoke alarms and regularly test them, never leave cooking unattended in the kitchen where the majority of fires start, avoid cooking while under the influence of alcohol and always turn off kitchen appliances when cooking is finished.

Smokers are reminded to ensure cigarettes are fully extinguished when they have finished.

Households are also reminded to make sure everyone knows how to react in the event of a fire, and to be extra careful to avoid an accident while driving.

Comments (6)

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8:30am Thu 7 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?
Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then? house on the hill
  • Score: 4

11:23am Thu 7 Aug 14

Isthisthebestswindon cando says...

house on the hill wrote:
Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?
Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?[/p][/quote]Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment. Isthisthebestswindon cando
  • Score: -3

11:48am Thu 7 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

Isthisthebestswindon cando wrote:
house on the hill wrote:
Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?
Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.
They are already paid to do the job. They know what's expected and no what the salary is before joining up.

Just like everyone else, their terms of employment can change at some point after they've taken the job.

Their pensions are already very generous and nobody expects the more senior/elderly firefighters to continually do all the serious physical aspects of the job.

This whole thing is politically motivated and driven by the public sector unions. We'll continue to see these strikes right up until the election next May.
[quote][p][bold]Isthisthebestswindon cando[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?[/p][/quote]Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.[/p][/quote]They are already paid to do the job. They know what's expected and no what the salary is before joining up. Just like everyone else, their terms of employment can change at some point after they've taken the job. Their pensions are already very generous and nobody expects the more senior/elderly firefighters to continually do all the serious physical aspects of the job. This whole thing is politically motivated and driven by the public sector unions. We'll continue to see these strikes right up until the election next May. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 4

3:05pm Thu 7 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

Isthisthebestswindon cando wrote:
house on the hill wrote:
Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?
Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.
And what about the commitment of the water companies to provide the water or the coachbuilders/mechan
ics to ensure they don't break down on the way to your house and you burn to death trapped inside waiting for them.

Everyone is so narrow minded these days, every job is as important and committed as every other one in the chain, ok so some may be more dangerous, but the salary (and choice) tends to reflect that. No one is a special case, we all rely on each other in different ways to get through our lives. What about pilots, or fuel tanker drivers, their jobs carry a high level of danger driving a mobile bomb every day.

Lets also look at some cold hard figures.

Assume a salary of £37,500 per year which is about average for an experienced fire fighter. After 30 years service you are entitled to a 2/3rds final salary pension, index linked at age 55. This will provide a guaranteed pension of £25k a year index linked.

Paying 13% of your salary for 30 years means you will have paid £146k into your pension scheme after 30 years.

On the news last week it was said that to provide a pension of £25,000 a year at current rates you would need a pension pot of £400k and that was at age 65. To have a pension paid earlier would require more (because it will be paid for longer). So even taking £400k that means that the taxpayer will have contributed a minimum £254k to your pension pot. Sorry but what exactly are you ******* moaning about???????
[quote][p][bold]Isthisthebestswindon cando[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?[/p][/quote]Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.[/p][/quote]And what about the commitment of the water companies to provide the water or the coachbuilders/mechan ics to ensure they don't break down on the way to your house and you burn to death trapped inside waiting for them. Everyone is so narrow minded these days, every job is as important and committed as every other one in the chain, ok so some may be more dangerous, but the salary (and choice) tends to reflect that. No one is a special case, we all rely on each other in different ways to get through our lives. What about pilots, or fuel tanker drivers, their jobs carry a high level of danger driving a mobile bomb every day. Lets also look at some cold hard figures. Assume a salary of £37,500 per year which is about average for an experienced fire fighter. After 30 years service you are entitled to a 2/3rds final salary pension, index linked at age 55. This will provide a guaranteed pension of £25k a year index linked. Paying 13% of your salary for 30 years means you will have paid £146k into your pension scheme after 30 years. On the news last week it was said that to provide a pension of £25,000 a year at current rates you would need a pension pot of £400k and that was at age 65. To have a pension paid earlier would require more (because it will be paid for longer). So even taking £400k that means that the taxpayer will have contributed a minimum £254k to your pension pot. Sorry but what exactly are you ******* moaning about??????? house on the hill
  • Score: 3

10:43am Fri 8 Aug 14

Compaq says...

Wasters. Just get out and do your public funded work. The public are simply fed up with your demands and laziness. Wake up people its the 21st century and WE don't owe you a living. You get a good wage and a good pension, if you don't like it, then resign or sell the Florida villas!
Wasters. Just get out and do your public funded work. The public are simply fed up with your demands and laziness. Wake up people its the 21st century and WE don't owe you a living. You get a good wage and a good pension, if you don't like it, then resign or sell the Florida villas! Compaq
  • Score: -1

11:43am Fri 8 Aug 14

Isthisthebestswindon cando says...

house on the hill wrote:
Isthisthebestswindon cando wrote:
house on the hill wrote:
Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?
Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.
And what about the commitment of the water companies to provide the water or the coachbuilders/mechan

ics to ensure they don't break down on the way to your house and you burn to death trapped inside waiting for them.

Everyone is so narrow minded these days, every job is as important and committed as every other one in the chain, ok so some may be more dangerous, but the salary (and choice) tends to reflect that. No one is a special case, we all rely on each other in different ways to get through our lives. What about pilots, or fuel tanker drivers, their jobs carry a high level of danger driving a mobile bomb every day.

Lets also look at some cold hard figures.

Assume a salary of £37,500 per year which is about average for an experienced fire fighter. After 30 years service you are entitled to a 2/3rds final salary pension, index linked at age 55. This will provide a guaranteed pension of £25k a year index linked.

Paying 13% of your salary for 30 years means you will have paid £146k into your pension scheme after 30 years.

On the news last week it was said that to provide a pension of £25,000 a year at current rates you would need a pension pot of £400k and that was at age 65. To have a pension paid earlier would require more (because it will be paid for longer). So even taking £400k that means that the taxpayer will have contributed a minimum £254k to your pension pot. Sorry but what exactly are you ******* moaning about???????
How incredibly rude.
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Isthisthebestswindon cando[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: Here we go again. So your employers are trying to change your working terms and conditions. Welcome to the real world that everyone else lives in! Just what exactly is it you think makes you so special that you should be treated differently to everyone else then?[/p][/quote]Because if my house is on fire these guys will walk into the flames to save my family - I'm happy to pay a bit more for that kind of commitment.[/p][/quote]And what about the commitment of the water companies to provide the water or the coachbuilders/mechan ics to ensure they don't break down on the way to your house and you burn to death trapped inside waiting for them. Everyone is so narrow minded these days, every job is as important and committed as every other one in the chain, ok so some may be more dangerous, but the salary (and choice) tends to reflect that. No one is a special case, we all rely on each other in different ways to get through our lives. What about pilots, or fuel tanker drivers, their jobs carry a high level of danger driving a mobile bomb every day. Lets also look at some cold hard figures. Assume a salary of £37,500 per year which is about average for an experienced fire fighter. After 30 years service you are entitled to a 2/3rds final salary pension, index linked at age 55. This will provide a guaranteed pension of £25k a year index linked. Paying 13% of your salary for 30 years means you will have paid £146k into your pension scheme after 30 years. On the news last week it was said that to provide a pension of £25,000 a year at current rates you would need a pension pot of £400k and that was at age 65. To have a pension paid earlier would require more (because it will be paid for longer). So even taking £400k that means that the taxpayer will have contributed a minimum £254k to your pension pot. Sorry but what exactly are you ******* moaning about???????[/p][/quote]How incredibly rude. Isthisthebestswindon cando
  • Score: 0

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