Petition started after death of new mother

Lucie Malangone, left  with her sister Emma Cadywould

Lucie Malangone, left with her sister Emma Cadywould

First published in News
Last updated
Swindon Advertiser: Photograph of the Author by , @BerenCross

EMMA Cadywould’s tragic death could yet generate a petition signed by tens of thousands of people which might transform care and treatment for postnatal depression across the country.

Emma, of Saxon Orchard, Watchfield, was struck by a train travelling at more than 100mph near South Marston on December 16, 2011, after a six-month battle with the condition.

An inquest to establish the cause of the 32-year-old’s death recorded a narrative verdict in November 2013, which does not attribute the cause of death to any individual person.

Emma’s family, led by sister Lucie Malangone, 33, of Carshalton in South London, launched a petition with change.org, with the aim of forcing the NHS to complete a review of care available for mothers suffering with postnatal depression and perinatal mental illness.

The petition has already attracted more than 30,000 supporters in less than six weeks.

Lucie does not have a numerical target in mind, but plans to file the petition on Simon Stevens, NHS England’s chief executive, in the New Year, when there would be more than 100,000 signatures if it keeps up its current rate of growth.

“We wanted to make it as though something could come out of it, rather than just people giving us pity,” she said.

“We want this all to be about what changes we can work for after what Emma went through.

“Word had spread around through various articles about what we were trying to do, even before the petition started, when change.org approached us and asked if we would start a petition for the changes we wanted.

“We agreed and they began promoting it with some targeted e-mails out to their contacts.

“Ideally, we want to take the petition to the chief executive and show him how shocking it is what’s available.

“I don’t think people will really know the full extent of it. We might be connected with Emma’s case, but this could happen to anyone, anywhere in the country.

“There is lots of campaigning going on at the moment. I read about one woman who told her doctor she wanted to kill herself more than 50 times and she wouldn’t be taken seriously.

“She turned her life upside down and moved from London to Nottingham, just to seek care.”

Lucie and her family maintain the gaps in care and treatment Emma was exposed to in her darkest hour are the reason she is no longer with them today.

For more information or to show your support for Lucie and her family’s cause, visit: www.change.org/en-GB/petitions/nhsengland-review-perinatal-care-postnatal-depression-treatment-rememberemsie-everyonesbusiness

Comments (1)

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12:44pm Wed 20 Aug 14

Badgersgetabadname says...

I do hope there is a positive response to this anything that raises the profile of depression and mental health has got to be a good thing.
The stigma that surrounds issue is alive and well.

My sympathies to the family and hope raising this issue helps you come through this awful experience.
I do hope there is a positive response to this anything that raises the profile of depression and mental health has got to be a good thing. The stigma that surrounds issue is alive and well. My sympathies to the family and hope raising this issue helps you come through this awful experience. Badgersgetabadname
  • Score: 10
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