Join the Big Drink Debate

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First published in News

PEOPLE in Wiltshire are being asked to have their say on drinking alcohol and its impact by joining in the Big Drink Debate.

Wiltshire Council is developing a fresh approach to improving and managing the delivery of information on healthier use of alcohol, treatment for problematic use and enforcement work in communities across the county.

Now people are being invited to contribute their views to the Big Drink Debate via an interactive web-based survey, with questions on their current knowledge of alcohol and the impact it has.

As well as the online survey there is a paper version available to ensure everyone has a chance to contribute.

Among other questions, the survey asks where people normally buy alcohol, their knowledge of the alcohol content of many popular drinks, and where they would go for help if they or somebody they knew needed help with their drinking.

The Big Drink Debate will help to inform and shape the new Wiltshire Alcohol Strategy and invites everyone to have their say.

Comments (6)

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8:08am Thu 21 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

The problems of additional crime that alcohol causes could be offset if the judiciary stopped accepting it as an excuse and mitigating factor and started sentencing those who commit crimes rather less unduly leniently than they insist on doing currently.

It wouldn't take long before people got the message, and those who really cannot restrain themselves would find themselves in prison for once - unable to blight the rest of the public with their pathetic behaviour.

There are already plenty of laws in place - and the judges' own sentencing guidelines clearly tell them that being drunk is actually an aggravating factor. Once they stop doing the opposite of what they're supposed to, we might start seeing a reduction in alcohol fueled crime... although, of course, much crime isn't actually committed due to the criminals being drunk, it's just recorded that way because defence lawyers always claim they were along with the rest of the unprovable 'claims' they make.

If all sentences were automatically increased by 20% of the criminal was drunk at the time of their offence(s), you'd soon see a miraculous situation occur where, apparently, all criminals in the dock are teetotal and never touch a drop, M'lud.
The problems of additional crime that alcohol causes could be offset if the judiciary stopped accepting it as an excuse and mitigating factor and started sentencing those who commit crimes rather less unduly leniently than they insist on doing currently. It wouldn't take long before people got the message, and those who really cannot restrain themselves would find themselves in prison for once - unable to blight the rest of the public with their pathetic behaviour. There are already plenty of laws in place - and the judges' own sentencing guidelines clearly tell them that being drunk is actually an aggravating factor. Once they stop doing the opposite of what they're supposed to, we might start seeing a reduction in alcohol fueled crime... although, of course, much crime isn't actually committed due to the criminals being drunk, it's just recorded that way because defence lawyers always claim they were along with the rest of the unprovable 'claims' they make. If all sentences were automatically increased by 20% of the criminal was drunk at the time of their offence(s), you'd soon see a miraculous situation occur where, apparently, all criminals in the dock are teetotal and never touch a drop, M'lud. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 4

8:36am Thu 21 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
The problems of additional crime that alcohol causes could be offset if the judiciary stopped accepting it as an excuse and mitigating factor and started sentencing those who commit crimes rather less unduly leniently than they insist on doing currently.

It wouldn't take long before people got the message, and those who really cannot restrain themselves would find themselves in prison for once - unable to blight the rest of the public with their pathetic behaviour.

There are already plenty of laws in place - and the judges' own sentencing guidelines clearly tell them that being drunk is actually an aggravating factor. Once they stop doing the opposite of what they're supposed to, we might start seeing a reduction in alcohol fueled crime... although, of course, much crime isn't actually committed due to the criminals being drunk, it's just recorded that way because defence lawyers always claim they were along with the rest of the unprovable 'claims' they make.

If all sentences were automatically increased by 20% of the criminal was drunk at the time of their offence(s), you'd soon see a miraculous situation occur where, apparently, all criminals in the dock are teetotal and never touch a drop, M'lud.
Surely we need to get to the root of why people do it rather than just punishing those who abuse it? Why are we one of the only countries that has this "binge" and "pre loading" culture with people going out "to get hammered". Most other countries when they go out it is about socialising and the drink is secondary. The money spent and the lives ruined by alcohol is staggering (no pun intended!). What is it that drives intelligent people to behave like animals all in the name of "fun!"
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: The problems of additional crime that alcohol causes could be offset if the judiciary stopped accepting it as an excuse and mitigating factor and started sentencing those who commit crimes rather less unduly leniently than they insist on doing currently. It wouldn't take long before people got the message, and those who really cannot restrain themselves would find themselves in prison for once - unable to blight the rest of the public with their pathetic behaviour. There are already plenty of laws in place - and the judges' own sentencing guidelines clearly tell them that being drunk is actually an aggravating factor. Once they stop doing the opposite of what they're supposed to, we might start seeing a reduction in alcohol fueled crime... although, of course, much crime isn't actually committed due to the criminals being drunk, it's just recorded that way because defence lawyers always claim they were along with the rest of the unprovable 'claims' they make. If all sentences were automatically increased by 20% of the criminal was drunk at the time of their offence(s), you'd soon see a miraculous situation occur where, apparently, all criminals in the dock are teetotal and never touch a drop, M'lud.[/p][/quote]Surely we need to get to the root of why people do it rather than just punishing those who abuse it? Why are we one of the only countries that has this "binge" and "pre loading" culture with people going out "to get hammered". Most other countries when they go out it is about socialising and the drink is secondary. The money spent and the lives ruined by alcohol is staggering (no pun intended!). What is it that drives intelligent people to behave like animals all in the name of "fun!" house on the hill
  • Score: -1

10:32am Thu 21 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

People drink because they enjoy it. It's not rocket science. It's not a problem until it turns violent, ugly or drunk people break laws. As said above, they are not dealt with - THAT'S the problem.

It's also a bit of myth about the UK being the 'only' country to binge drink. Most other Western nations have the same issues. America is actually starting to become even worse, despite (or possibly because of) their Over-21 legislation.
People drink because they enjoy it. It's not rocket science. It's not a problem until it turns violent, ugly or drunk people break laws. As said above, they are not dealt with - THAT'S the problem. It's also a bit of myth about the UK being the 'only' country to binge drink. Most other Western nations have the same issues. America is actually starting to become even worse, despite (or possibly because of) their Over-21 legislation. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 4

4:41pm Thu 21 Aug 14

mrwoo says...

hahaha house on the hill, you must surely be one boring barsteward.
I love getting drunk!
hahaha house on the hill, you must surely be one boring barsteward. I love getting drunk! mrwoo
  • Score: 3

6:28pm Thu 21 Aug 14

Localboy86 says...

Il take you for a pint house on the hill seeing as you have no friends ;)
Il take you for a pint house on the hill seeing as you have no friends ;) Localboy86
  • Score: 0

7:29pm Thu 21 Aug 14

bertiefaversham says...

Personally I believe the council should concentrate on the basics eg get the bins emptied on time and leave the social agenda to the health professionals.
I dont need local authorities telling me what to do.
Mind you I have just had a very nice pint in the hop inn
Personally I believe the council should concentrate on the basics eg get the bins emptied on time and leave the social agenda to the health professionals. I dont need local authorities telling me what to do. Mind you I have just had a very nice pint in the hop inn bertiefaversham
  • Score: 2
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