PLEASE keep your letters to 250 words maximum giving your name, address and daytime telephone number - even on emails. Email: letters@swindonadvertiser.co.uk. Write: Swindon Advertiser, Unit 1 and 2 Richmond House, Edison Park, Swindon, SN3 3RB. Phone: 01793 501806.

Anonymity is granted only at the discretion of the editor, who also reserves the right to edit letters.

Charities benefit too

Your article on November 18 reported my comment that the profits made on refreshments at the Christmas Charity Market at Christ Church on Saturday, November 16, would be put toward the repairs to the church clock, which are under way.

But I should have added that the main aim of the event was for over 40 separate charities to have stalls to raise their own funds.

In previous years the total funds raised have exceeded £3,800.

This is an example of the community use of the Christ Church building, as befits its Grade 2* listed status. The church also frequently features on your picture pages.

The church car park was in full use for the Christmas Market, as it is during most days. In the SA article on November 15 about the flats to be built opposite it was suggested that the church car park is free. The car park is only for permit holders and visitors to the church or Community Centre.

Caroline Pitt, Chair, Friends of Christ Church

One voter’s top tips

Dear candidate for the North Swindon Constituency.

Did you know there’s an election coming? It’s on December 12 apparently and your party’s manifesto should be launched sometime this week. I always record a vote, even if it is ‘none of the above’, so I thought you might like to know how I make my decision. These are the ‘rules’ I’ve used for a few years and I commend them to you.

1. You have to ask for my vote. I might like you, I might have even voted for you in the past a lot or a little. But you still have to ask.

2. Even if I think I don’t like you, if you ask, I will give your request my serious consideration. You may be surprised what asking actually achieves for you.

3. That applies to the maybes as well. The ones who suggest visions of things I like but somehow always seem illusory. Just ask.

4. The more often you ask the more often I consider your case.

5. In order of the amount of consideration I will give ‘asking’ means: candidate knocking the door, canvasser knocking the door (leave a card if I’m out), a public meeting in my ward, candidate canvassing in a local shopping area, a leaflet through the door and lastly a canvasser phone call.

6. Other approaches might work but advertising hoardings and party political broadcasts are a bit of a turn off, unless your outfit is trying not to win this one in which case they can be quite funny.

6. Digital electioneering is a non-starter. If you want me to go to the polling station you have to get out in the cold and wet too.

8. I consider all electoral communication sent to me whether personalised or not. I prefer facts to photo ops because I can check any claims made. Gurning at the camera outside a local good cause is not a statement of any worth.

9. Any personal attacks on any other candidate will debar you from my vote.

10. I need to hear from you before polling day. The sooner the better. If you don’t ask you don’t get.

An elector in North Swindon

Name and address supplied

Town congested enough

David Renard is right. When talking of tackling climate change he said that action speaks louder than words (SA column, November 21).

It is therefore somewhat disconcerting to read councillor Gary Summer waxing lyrical in the same edition about the need to get more people living in Swindon and travelling to work in Bristol, Reading and Oxford.

We need to get people out of their cars and not encourage more of them to travel in and out on a daily basis.

The town is congested and polluted enough as it is.

Martin Wicks, Welcombe Avenue, Park North

Letters to the Editor: What do you think?

Do you have an opinion on our reader letters? Get in touch.

Add your contribution now By uploading a contribution, for use online and in print, you accept our contributor terms. You will either own or have permission to use anything you provide.