Swindon AdvertiserMental health fear for young jobless (From Swindon Advertiser)

Get involved! Send photos, video, news & views. Text SWINDON NEWS to 80360 or email us

Mental health fear for young jobless

Swindon Advertiser: Many young unemployed find themselves in a hopeless situation                    Picture: Photo library Many young unemployed find themselves in a hopeless situation Picture: Photo library

ALMOST one in five young people from the south west have experienced mental health issues as a direct result of unemployment, according to a new report.

Swindon has seen a 186 per cent increase in the number of young people claiming benefits for more than six months since the beginning of the recession. Nationally, the report found that young people who are long-term unemployed are more than twice as likely as their peers to believe they have nothing to live for.

Dermot Finch, Southern Regional Director of The Prince’s Trust, said: “Here in Swindon, 330 young people are facing long-term unemployment and there is a real danger that these young people will become hopeless, as well as jobless.

“Our research highlights that unemployed young people are significantly less likely to ask for help if they are struggling to cope. “Our message to them is this: there are organisations out there that can help you. At The Prince’s Trust, we provide vulnerable young people with sustained support, through both our long-term personal development programmes and our work within schools across the capital. If you are struggling to get back into work, education or training, you are not alone and you need not struggle alone.”

The findings also show that allmost one in five young people from the South West have experienced at least one of the following as a direct result of unemployment – suicidal thoughts, self harm, panic attacks, being prescribed anti-depressants, feelings of self-loathing, insomnia, feeling inferior to others, difficulty controlling anger, drinking large amounts of alcohol or taking drugs.

Almost one in four young people in the region said they feel like an ‘outcast’ with the report finding that the long term unemployed are significantly more likely to feel this way. The Prince’s Trust, which tackles youth unemployment, last year worked with 3,453 disadvantaged young people across the South West.

The youth charity is now calling for urgent support from health agencies and employers to fund its vital work with long-term unemployed young people battling mental health issues. With more support, the youth charity can help more young people build their self-esteem and move into work.

For more information visit www.princes-trust.org.uk/youthindex or follow The Trust on Facebook or Twitter.

Comments (3)

Please log in to enable comment sorting

3:38pm Fri 3 Jan 14

bradley red 1 says...

Sad sign of the times! feel for the ones who want to work but there is nothing out there for them.
Sad sign of the times! feel for the ones who want to work but there is nothing out there for them. bradley red 1
  • Score: 0

11:29am Sat 4 Jan 14

Ringer says...

What an interesting perspective this report takes.

Apparently, 'drug taking' is a direct result of unemployment. Which sort of begs two questions:

1. We're constantly told that the unemployed on benefits don't spent their money on drugs or booze, yet apparently they're 'drinking large amounts of alcohol or taking drugs'. Who is giving it to them for free?

2. It is well documented that around a third of all under-24 year olds us cannabis on a regular basis. More modern forms of cannabis are also well documented to induce mental health problems.

So, would it not be far more sensible, reasonable and rational to conclude that, in reality, 20% of young people in the south west suffer mental health problems due to their use of cannabis - given that would represent roughly half of those who're regular users of cannabis?

But, no, let's blame it on the fact they haven't got a job eh?
What an interesting perspective this report takes. Apparently, 'drug taking' is a direct result of unemployment. Which sort of begs two questions: 1. We're constantly told that the unemployed on benefits don't spent their money on drugs or booze, yet apparently they're 'drinking large amounts of alcohol or taking drugs'. Who is giving it to them for free? 2. It is well documented that around a third of all under-24 year olds us cannabis on a regular basis. More modern forms of cannabis are also well documented to induce mental health problems. So, would it not be far more sensible, reasonable and rational to conclude that, in reality, 20% of young people in the south west suffer mental health problems due to their use of cannabis - given that would represent roughly half of those who're regular users of cannabis? But, no, let's blame it on the fact they haven't got a job eh? Ringer
  • Score: 1

1:43pm Wed 8 Jan 14

Badgersgetabadname says...

Out of all the listed issues such as self loathing, self harm, worthlessness and suicidal thoughts you pick up on a drink or drugs issues. Your percentage of 20% I am curious to know where this has come from other than your own comment?
Aging population constantly point fingers at the youth of today and say boo and shame but never offer any solutions?
Or have you based your opinions on extensive dealing with youth projects.....?? Maybe a spell in the army would do them some good?
When people have no responsibility or reason what do you expect to happen?
Out of all the listed issues such as self loathing, self harm, worthlessness and suicidal thoughts you pick up on a drink or drugs issues. Your percentage of 20% I am curious to know where this has come from other than your own comment? Aging population constantly point fingers at the youth of today and say boo and shame but never offer any solutions? Or have you based your opinions on extensive dealing with youth projects.....?? Maybe a spell in the army would do them some good? When people have no responsibility or reason what do you expect to happen? Badgersgetabadname
  • Score: 0

Comments are closed on this article.

click2find

About cookies

We want you to enjoy your visit to our website. That's why we use cookies to enhance your experience. By staying on our website you agree to our use of cookies. Find out more about the cookies we use.

I agree