Now your Swindon home is worth £10k more

Estate agents in Swindon have noticed an increase in first time buyers

Estate agents in Swindon have noticed an increase in first time buyers

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THE price of the average house in Swindon has risen by almost £10,000 over the past year as the market continues to surge.

The average property in the town is currently priced at £192,030, which is a five per cent annual increase, and £14,000 higher than the national average.

The new report into the state of the nation’s housing market, published by Nationwide Building Society yesterday, shows prices in London are soaring far in excess of the rest of the UK, with the average house in the capital now costing around £72,000 more than in 2007.

This has come as good news for local estate agents, who have seen an increase in first time buyers.

Colin Cox, director of Chappell estate agents on Victoria Road, said: “The last 12 months of trading has seen confidence returning to the market. It is always a mix of factors that contribute to that.”

Colin said foreign investment pricing people out of London had contributed to the price rise across the south.

“Large amounts of money coming into the country from abroad has stablised the expensive properties, especially in London,” he said. “Those people have then moved out to more peripheral areas with lots of cash.

“It can be about a 10 or 15 year cycle of ups and downs, and they vary in intensity. We have kept it neat and tidy, and have survived with old clients coming back. I am indebted to those people I have worked with.”

Ross Sutton, director of Richard James estate agents, was cautious about too fast a rise in prices.

“The last six months have been reasonably busy,” he said.

“The start of the year is normally a bit quieter, and has usually seen a reduction in stock levels. Not a lot of people were going to market at the time, but recently it has been very busy.

“Interest rates are still low and there are a lot more first time buyers, which is a great thing to see.

“Organic growth is the key to any sustainable market. The reality of any averages is that across any local area there are massive variations.

“Over the last six years, while the market has been very depressed, a lot of first time buyers have had an opportunity to save a decent deposit. Although prices are rising people are better equipped to raise a mortgage.

“I would not want it to grow too fast too soon because that will make it too difficult for first time buyers to enter the market.”

Robert Gardner, Nationwide's chief economist, said: “Although all regions saw house price growth in the first quarter, ten of the 13 regions have yet to surpass their pre-crisis peaks. London, the Outer Metropolitan and the Outer South East are the exceptions.”

Neil Parker, of Swindon Mortgage Solutions, said: “There has been an upturn in activity, since about September last year.

“It could be that people have managed to save up enough money over the last few years and are making their moves now. First time buyers seem to be a little bit more able to get the money together for a deposit.”

Comments (33)

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6:48am Thu 3 Apr 14

EastleazeRed says...

Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .
Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k . EastleazeRed
  • Score: -1

7:36am Thu 3 Apr 14

Al Smith says...

Wow, err, great? My house is worth £10,000 more, so what? Unless I'm downsizing or re-mortgaging I don't benefit one little bit. Perhaps if I was a hack with a couple of BTL properties I might be more excited?

If any other cost of living (food, gas or electricity) went up I doubt newspapers would be so ecstatic. Because the truth of this rise is that all those people trying to buy a house now need to pay even more so need either a bigger mortgage or larger deposit (or both).
Wow, err, great? My house is worth £10,000 more, so what? Unless I'm downsizing or re-mortgaging I don't benefit one little bit. Perhaps if I was a hack with a couple of BTL properties I might be more excited? If any other cost of living (food, gas or electricity) went up I doubt newspapers would be so ecstatic. Because the truth of this rise is that all those people trying to buy a house now need to pay even more so need either a bigger mortgage or larger deposit (or both). Al Smith
  • Score: 13

7:40am Thu 3 Apr 14

LordAshOfTheBrake says...

EastleazeRed wrote:
Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .
If your looking to down size then the relative price of your house should be higher thus leaving you some left over. Unless you're looking to move to a "nicer" area in which case you will always have the issue of like for like house being more expensive.

Plenty of 2 and even 3 bedroom houses on the market for less than 125k.
[quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .[/p][/quote]If your looking to down size then the relative price of your house should be higher thus leaving you some left over. Unless you're looking to move to a "nicer" area in which case you will always have the issue of like for like house being more expensive. Plenty of 2 and even 3 bedroom houses on the market for less than 125k. LordAshOfTheBrake
  • Score: 3

7:53am Thu 3 Apr 14

EastleazeRed says...

Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .
Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it . EastleazeRed
  • Score: -2

8:00am Thu 3 Apr 14

EastleazeRed says...

LordAshOfTheBrake wrote:
EastleazeRed wrote:
Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .
If your looking to down size then the relative price of your house should be higher thus leaving you some left over. Unless you're looking to move to a "nicer" area in which case you will always have the issue of like for like house being more expensive.

Plenty of 2 and even 3 bedroom houses on the market for less than 125k.
House prices at the bottom end of the market are rising a lot quicker than houses at the top end of the market , ive seen prices rise for a 2 bedroom property 15k in the last 6 months and where as 4 bedroom properties are staying around the same .
[quote][p][bold]LordAshOfTheBrake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .[/p][/quote]If your looking to down size then the relative price of your house should be higher thus leaving you some left over. Unless you're looking to move to a "nicer" area in which case you will always have the issue of like for like house being more expensive. Plenty of 2 and even 3 bedroom houses on the market for less than 125k.[/p][/quote]House prices at the bottom end of the market are rising a lot quicker than houses at the top end of the market , ive seen prices rise for a 2 bedroom property 15k in the last 6 months and where as 4 bedroom properties are staying around the same . EastleazeRed
  • Score: 0

8:47am Thu 3 Apr 14

Davidsyrett says...

EastleazeRed wrote:
LordAshOfTheBrake wrote:
EastleazeRed wrote:
Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .
If your looking to down size then the relative price of your house should be higher thus leaving you some left over. Unless you're looking to move to a "nicer" area in which case you will always have the issue of like for like house being more expensive.

Plenty of 2 and even 3 bedroom houses on the market for less than 125k.
House prices at the bottom end of the market are rising a lot quicker than houses at the top end of the market , ive seen prices rise for a 2 bedroom property 15k in the last 6 months and where as 4 bedroom properties are staying around the same .
Not true, round our way 4 bedroom house prices have shot up, on average £15/20K. since we moved last year. Once again it's a sellers market, lets hope we're not heading for another boom & bust.
[quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]LordAshOfTheBrake[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Tell me about it ! This right to buy scheme has created the bubble the government wanted . Pushed all the 2 bed homes above the 125 k threshold giving the government millions in extra stamp duty . I was looking to downsize, pay off my mormortgage and have a bit left over for a rainy day , no chance now the average 2 bed in Swindon is now around 140 k .[/p][/quote]If your looking to down size then the relative price of your house should be higher thus leaving you some left over. Unless you're looking to move to a "nicer" area in which case you will always have the issue of like for like house being more expensive. Plenty of 2 and even 3 bedroom houses on the market for less than 125k.[/p][/quote]House prices at the bottom end of the market are rising a lot quicker than houses at the top end of the market , ive seen prices rise for a 2 bedroom property 15k in the last 6 months and where as 4 bedroom properties are staying around the same .[/p][/quote]Not true, round our way 4 bedroom house prices have shot up, on average £15/20K. since we moved last year. Once again it's a sellers market, lets hope we're not heading for another boom & bust. Davidsyrett
  • Score: 4

9:29am Thu 3 Apr 14

mjey says...

What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless. mjey
  • Score: -4

10:44am Thu 3 Apr 14

Davidsyrett says...

mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
17%?? That means that only 37,000 people in swindon would own all the properties!!!! that must average out about 3 or 4 each, I think not.
[quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]17%?? That means that only 37,000 people in swindon would own all the properties!!!! that must average out about 3 or 4 each, I think not. Davidsyrett
  • Score: 5

12:31pm Thu 3 Apr 14

Even Angrier Monkey says...

Davidsyrett wrote:
mjey wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
17%?? That means that only 37,000 people in swindon would own all the properties!!!! that must average out about 3 or 4 each, I think not.
Agreed. Nice use of a totally made up statistic by mjey though
[quote][p][bold]Davidsyrett[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]17%?? That means that only 37,000 people in swindon would own all the properties!!!! that must average out about 3 or 4 each, I think not.[/p][/quote]Agreed. Nice use of a totally made up statistic by mjey though Even Angrier Monkey
  • Score: 4

12:50pm Thu 3 Apr 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

Housing costs in Swindon actually buck the regional trend by quite some margin. Go to most other towns nearby in Wiltshire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Gloucestershire and you'll find the housing is significantly more expensive, so it's good to hear that housing costs here are increasing - it suggests the town is becoming more affluent.
Housing costs in Swindon actually buck the regional trend by quite some margin. Go to most other towns nearby in Wiltshire, Oxfordshire, Berkshire, Gloucestershire and you'll find the housing is significantly more expensive, so it's good to hear that housing costs here are increasing - it suggests the town is becoming more affluent. The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 0

1:14pm Thu 3 Apr 14

house on the hill says...

EastleazeRed wrote:
Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .
Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters.

And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from!
[quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .[/p][/quote]Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters. And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from! house on the hill
  • Score: 2

1:22pm Thu 3 Apr 14

LordAshOfTheBrake says...

house on the hill wrote:
EastleazeRed wrote:
Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .
Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters.

And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from!
I think they actually mean the "help to buy" scheme rather than "right to buy".

Help to buy being the scheme to guarantee those with low deposits.

Stamp duty starts at £125,000. At £250,000 it steps up to a higher rate.
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .[/p][/quote]Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters. And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from![/p][/quote]I think they actually mean the "help to buy" scheme rather than "right to buy". Help to buy being the scheme to guarantee those with low deposits. Stamp duty starts at £125,000. At £250,000 it steps up to a higher rate. LordAshOfTheBrake
  • Score: 5

1:25pm Thu 3 Apr 14

house on the hill says...

"""mjey says... It's a bubble created by the government, developers and banks""

Not actually true its just the basic economics of supply and demand. If there are more buyers out there then the supply lessens and sellers put their prices up because they can. And actually this week there was news that there are less mortgages being agreed because lenders have finally worked out that how much you earn is not as important as how much you can afford to repay. If you have loans and a fistful of credit cards or kids, then clearly your ability to repay is less than someone with none of those things on the same income. No wonder they made so many bad lending's if there were just using the income multipliers!

Rising prices dont help buyers or in most case sellers as most are looking to trade up either by size or area and all it does is widens the gap betweens the rungs on the ladder. The only people to benefit from rising house prices are Estate Agents, lenders, solicitors and removal firms, so for most this is very bad news!
"""mjey says... It's a bubble created by the government, developers and banks"" Not actually true its just the basic economics of supply and demand. If there are more buyers out there then the supply lessens and sellers put their prices up because they can. And actually this week there was news that there are less mortgages being agreed because lenders have finally worked out that how much you earn is not as important as how much you can afford to repay. If you have loans and a fistful of credit cards or kids, then clearly your ability to repay is less than someone with none of those things on the same income. No wonder they made so many bad lending's if there were just using the income multipliers! Rising prices dont help buyers or in most case sellers as most are looking to trade up either by size or area and all it does is widens the gap betweens the rungs on the ladder. The only people to benefit from rising house prices are Estate Agents, lenders, solicitors and removal firms, so for most this is very bad news! house on the hill
  • Score: 4

1:26pm Thu 3 Apr 14

EastleazeRed says...

house on the hill wrote:
EastleazeRed wrote:
Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .
Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters.

And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from!
You do not pay stamp duty on any property up to 125 k , anything over starts at 1% and can go up to 15% if your buying over 2 million .
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .[/p][/quote]Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters. And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from![/p][/quote]You do not pay stamp duty on any property up to 125 k , anything over starts at 1% and can go up to 15% if your buying over 2 million . EastleazeRed
  • Score: 1

1:29pm Thu 3 Apr 14

KeyboardWarri0r says...

Don't see how this is good news. If houses were still 4 X the average salary then people could afford a good quality of life, only one working parent so children would be raised properly and have a generally happier life.

As it is nearly 7 X at the moment owning a house cripples people.
Don't see how this is good news. If houses were still 4 X the average salary then people could afford a good quality of life, only one working parent so children would be raised properly and have a generally happier life. As it is nearly 7 X at the moment owning a house cripples people. KeyboardWarri0r
  • Score: 9

1:51pm Thu 3 Apr 14

house on the hill says...

EastleazeRed wrote:
house on the hill wrote:
EastleazeRed wrote:
Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .
Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters.

And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from!
You do not pay stamp duty on any property up to 125 k , anything over starts at 1% and can go up to 15% if your buying over 2 million .
apologies, I stand corrected, cheers
[quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .[/p][/quote]Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters. And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from![/p][/quote]You do not pay stamp duty on any property up to 125 k , anything over starts at 1% and can go up to 15% if your buying over 2 million .[/p][/quote]apologies, I stand corrected, cheers house on the hill
  • Score: 5

4:04pm Thu 3 Apr 14

A.Baron-Cohen says...

The very fact that prices are going up fast whilst incomes are still 12% below their 2006 peak, means that a bubble is now forming.
Enter this market at your own risks.
The very fact that prices are going up fast whilst incomes are still 12% below their 2006 peak, means that a bubble is now forming. Enter this market at your own risks. A.Baron-Cohen
  • Score: -2

9:33pm Thu 3 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

Location, location , location? Twaddle, the only place to live is within your means, 2 Bedroom ex council house in Slough ( Dangerous place to live) 220k

2 Bedroom ex council house in Royal Wootton Bassett (lovely place to live) 125k, go figure!
Location, location , location? Twaddle, the only place to live is within your means, 2 Bedroom ex council house in Slough ( Dangerous place to live) 220k 2 Bedroom ex council house in Royal Wootton Bassett (lovely place to live) 125k, go figure! Mukkin
  • Score: 2

9:45pm Thu 3 Apr 14

barlizard says...

house on the hill wrote:
EastleazeRed wrote:
Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .
Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters.

And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from!
Stamp duty is 1% over £125000, and 3% over £250000!
[quote][p][bold]house on the hill[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]EastleazeRed[/bold] wrote: Unfortunately its all about supply and demand . First time buyer properties are are being snapped up before they even hit the market due to landlords being able to view properties before anyone else , therefore pushing the price of a starter home even more . As I stated prpreviously the right to buy scheme has had the effect the government wanted , first time buyers now need a bigger deposit making it even harder to get on the housing ladder , and the government are creaming in the extra revenue in stamp duty to pay for it .[/p][/quote]Firstly right to buy is grossly unfair on 2 counts. Firstly, those who have already had their low rents subsidised by the tax payer are then given a discount to buy the house outright and usually at a price that doesn't provide enough for another to be built to replace it (talk about wanting jam on it and cream and a cherry on top!) and secondly it doesn't apply to private renters. And the last time i looked stamp duty started at £250,000 so no idea where your figure is coming from![/p][/quote]Stamp duty is 1% over £125000, and 3% over £250000! barlizard
  • Score: 0

9:46pm Thu 3 Apr 14

MrAngry says...

mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
[quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless. MrAngry
  • Score: 1

10:30pm Thu 3 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

MrAngry wrote:
mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol

Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D
[quote][p][bold]MrAngry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.[/p][/quote]I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D Mukkin
  • Score: 3

10:51pm Thu 3 Apr 14

madreeves says...

I do feel sorry for younger people trying to get on the housing ladder. They think spending £130,000 + for a box is acceptable because they have no choice I the matter.. Anyone who bought a house in the mid-90's in Swindon will know the average price for a little 2 bed then was around £30,000.00. Back then, it was 3/4 times your salary but it's nowhere near now. The difference in price in less than 20 years is just staggering.
I do feel sorry for younger people trying to get on the housing ladder. They think spending £130,000 + for a box is acceptable because they have no choice I the matter.. Anyone who bought a house in the mid-90's in Swindon will know the average price for a little 2 bed then was around £30,000.00. Back then, it was 3/4 times your salary but it's nowhere near now. The difference in price in less than 20 years is just staggering. madreeves
  • Score: 1

11:27am Fri 4 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

Every child of teenage years should watch this film as part of the school curriculum, in fact a lot of adults should watch this film, maybe then they would understand fully their place in the pecking order, you'd certainly understand the motives of the bankers, property developers and Government once you've watched it!

https://www.youtube.
com/watch?v=5fbvquHS
PJU
Every child of teenage years should watch this film as part of the school curriculum, in fact a lot of adults should watch this film, maybe then they would understand fully their place in the pecking order, you'd certainly understand the motives of the bankers, property developers and Government once you've watched it! https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=5fbvquHS PJU Mukkin
  • Score: 0

11:33am Fri 4 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

Mukkin wrote:
Every child of teenage years should watch this film as part of the school curriculum, in fact a lot of adults should watch this film, maybe then they would understand fully their place in the pecking order, you'd certainly understand the motives of the bankers, property developers and Government once you've watched it!

https://www.youtube.

com/watch?v=5fbvquHS

PJU
I don't think the link works, it's The Four Horsemen search it on Google, well worth a watch
[quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: Every child of teenage years should watch this film as part of the school curriculum, in fact a lot of adults should watch this film, maybe then they would understand fully their place in the pecking order, you'd certainly understand the motives of the bankers, property developers and Government once you've watched it! https://www.youtube. com/watch?v=5fbvquHS PJU[/p][/quote]I don't think the link works, it's The Four Horsemen search it on Google, well worth a watch Mukkin
  • Score: 0

12:36pm Fri 4 Apr 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

madreeves wrote:
I do feel sorry for younger people trying to get on the housing ladder. They think spending £130,000 + for a box is acceptable because they have no choice I the matter.. Anyone who bought a house in the mid-90's in Swindon will know the average price for a little 2 bed then was around £30,000.00. Back then, it was 3/4 times your salary but it's nowhere near now. The difference in price in less than 20 years is just staggering.
I bought a two bed in '97. It cost 65,000 as was about average at the time.

Taking into account average inflation of around 4% since then, I make it that it should be around £125,000 now. Which funnily enough is pretty much exactly what that house sold for about 6 months ago.
[quote][p][bold]madreeves[/bold] wrote: I do feel sorry for younger people trying to get on the housing ladder. They think spending £130,000 + for a box is acceptable because they have no choice I the matter.. Anyone who bought a house in the mid-90's in Swindon will know the average price for a little 2 bed then was around £30,000.00. Back then, it was 3/4 times your salary but it's nowhere near now. The difference in price in less than 20 years is just staggering.[/p][/quote]I bought a two bed in '97. It cost 65,000 as was about average at the time. Taking into account average inflation of around 4% since then, I make it that it should be around £125,000 now. Which funnily enough is pretty much exactly what that house sold for about 6 months ago. The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 0

12:41pm Fri 4 Apr 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

Mukkin wrote:
MrAngry wrote:
mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol

Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D
I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it.

Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?
[quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MrAngry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.[/p][/quote]I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D[/p][/quote]I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it. Perhaps you just need to buy a better house? The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 1

5:03pm Fri 4 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Mukkin wrote:
MrAngry wrote:
mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol

Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D
I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it.

Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?
Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D
[quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MrAngry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.[/p][/quote]I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D[/p][/quote]I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it. Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?[/p][/quote]Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D Mukkin
  • Score: 0

5:15pm Fri 4 Apr 14

supersaver says...

Good news!

I am lucky not to be affected by higher house prices but good news for who, Estate Agents, thats about it.
So people pay more of money earn't on a mortgage which means they have less to spend on 'luxuries' like food or if lucky even going out which in turn means hard working people running a shop/restaurant will lose trade because of less customers etc etc etc which in turn means higher unemployment and another HOUSING PRICE CRASH.
Good news! I am lucky not to be affected by higher house prices but good news for who, Estate Agents, thats about it. So people pay more of money earn't on a mortgage which means they have less to spend on 'luxuries' like food or if lucky even going out which in turn means hard working people running a shop/restaurant will lose trade because of less customers etc etc etc which in turn means higher unemployment and another HOUSING PRICE CRASH. supersaver
  • Score: 2

5:19pm Fri 4 Apr 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

Mukkin wrote:
The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Mukkin wrote:
MrAngry wrote:
mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol

Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D
I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it.

Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?
Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D
Good for you, but really?

In February the RWB area had 106 reported crimes from a population of about 11,000. Around 1% of the population therefore reported a crime of some kind in Februrary.

In Swindon during the same time period, 465 crimes were reported from a population of around 200,000 - that's about 0.25% of the population.

Swindon is therefore has 1/4 of the reported crime in RWB. Admittedly the statistics also include villages around and near to RWB, but then so do the Swindon statistics.
[quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MrAngry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.[/p][/quote]I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D[/p][/quote]I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it. Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?[/p][/quote]Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D[/p][/quote]Good for you, but really? In February the RWB area had 106 reported crimes from a population of about 11,000. Around 1% of the population therefore reported a crime of some kind in Februrary. In Swindon during the same time period, 465 crimes were reported from a population of around 200,000 - that's about 0.25% of the population. Swindon is therefore has 1/4 of the reported crime in RWB. Admittedly the statistics also include villages around and near to RWB, but then so do the Swindon statistics. The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
  • Score: 0

5:57pm Fri 4 Apr 14

supersaver says...

People like Mukkin give the people of RWB a bad name, I am sure RWB is on the whole a nice place to live as is the vast majority of Swindon. He obviously
has nothing to do in RWB,
where does he go to the
cinema,
bowling,
ice skating,
swimming,
speedway,
football,
dog racing,
Athletics,
bowls,
tennis,
French/Spanish/Itali
an/Chinese(not takeaway)Mexican, Portuguese, Caribbean Restaurants and more?

Where does he work?
Why do we large tail backs coming into Swindon every morning.
If people like Mukkin don't like places like Slough/Swindon why read the Swindon Advertiser?

Get a life.
People like Mukkin give the people of RWB a bad name, I am sure RWB is on the whole a nice place to live as is the vast majority of Swindon. He obviously has nothing to do in RWB, where does he go to the cinema, bowling, ice skating, swimming, speedway, football, dog racing, Athletics, bowls, tennis, French/Spanish/Itali an/Chinese(not takeaway)Mexican, Portuguese, Caribbean Restaurants and more? Where does he work? Why do we large tail backs coming into Swindon every morning. If people like Mukkin don't like places like Slough/Swindon why read the Swindon Advertiser? Get a life. supersaver
  • Score: 0

7:56pm Fri 4 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

supersaver wrote:
People like Mukkin give the people of RWB a bad name, I am sure RWB is on the whole a nice place to live as is the vast majority of Swindon. He obviously
has nothing to do in RWB,
where does he go to the
cinema,
bowling,
ice skating,
swimming,
speedway,
football,
dog racing,
Athletics,
bowls,
tennis,
French/Spanish/Itali

an/Chinese(not takeaway)Mexican, Portuguese, Caribbean Restaurants and more?

Where does he work?
Why do we large tail backs coming into Swindon every morning.
If people like Mukkin don't like places like Slough/Swindon why read the Swindon Advertiser?

Get a life.
Oh Supersniper (sic), have I rattled your cage?

How on earth am I giving Bassett a bad name, lots of people from Swindon move here :-D

How can you make the assumption I have nothing to do in this lovely market town?

We in Bassett support the local businesses creating better community bonding, something missing the last time I drove quickly through Swindon lol

As for work, I have a horizontal income, that means I don't really need to get out of bed in the morning to earn a salary, it appears in my bank like magic, as for getting a life, well, I have a wonderful life, holidays abroad, nice car, beautiful house (mortgage free I hasten to add) what more do I need?

Why do I read the SA? Well that's easy to answer, it makes me realise how lucky I am :-D

How about you get a life ha!
[quote][p][bold]supersaver[/bold] wrote: People like Mukkin give the people of RWB a bad name, I am sure RWB is on the whole a nice place to live as is the vast majority of Swindon. He obviously has nothing to do in RWB, where does he go to the cinema, bowling, ice skating, swimming, speedway, football, dog racing, Athletics, bowls, tennis, French/Spanish/Itali an/Chinese(not takeaway)Mexican, Portuguese, Caribbean Restaurants and more? Where does he work? Why do we large tail backs coming into Swindon every morning. If people like Mukkin don't like places like Slough/Swindon why read the Swindon Advertiser? Get a life.[/p][/quote]Oh Supersniper (sic), have I rattled your cage? How on earth am I giving Bassett a bad name, lots of people from Swindon move here :-D How can you make the assumption I have nothing to do in this lovely market town? We in Bassett support the local businesses creating better community bonding, something missing the last time I drove quickly through Swindon lol As for work, I have a horizontal income, that means I don't really need to get out of bed in the morning to earn a salary, it appears in my bank like magic, as for getting a life, well, I have a wonderful life, holidays abroad, nice car, beautiful house (mortgage free I hasten to add) what more do I need? Why do I read the SA? Well that's easy to answer, it makes me realise how lucky I am :-D How about you get a life ha! Mukkin
  • Score: -2

10:24am Sat 5 Apr 14

Mukkin says...

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Mukkin wrote:
The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Mukkin wrote:
MrAngry wrote:
mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol

Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D
I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it.

Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?
Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D
Good for you, but really?

In February the RWB area had 106 reported crimes from a population of about 11,000. Around 1% of the population therefore reported a crime of some kind in Februrary.

In Swindon during the same time period, 465 crimes were reported from a population of around 200,000 - that's about 0.25% of the population.

Swindon is therefore has 1/4 of the reported crime in RWB. Admittedly the statistics also include villages around and near to RWB, but then so do the Swindon statistics.
Nice try there Grumps, you can do a little more of a detailed search regarding RWB and pinpoint the town itself, where in fact there were 47 reported crimes, where as your survey of Swindon was just the town centre with a total 465 reported crimes, if you tap the little icon that says 1 mile radius then the figure jumps to 635 reported crimes lol, if you draw your own map and include the villages( I'm sure they're the ones you meant lol) of Penhill, Park North and South, Pinehurst and the like, that figure climbs to an incredible 1146 reported crimes lol..

So putting false information up to try and prove a point has made you look a bit of a plonker, that's why people move to Royal Wootton Bassett ....Idiot lol
[quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MrAngry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.[/p][/quote]I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D[/p][/quote]I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it. Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?[/p][/quote]Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D[/p][/quote]Good for you, but really? In February the RWB area had 106 reported crimes from a population of about 11,000. Around 1% of the population therefore reported a crime of some kind in Februrary. In Swindon during the same time period, 465 crimes were reported from a population of around 200,000 - that's about 0.25% of the population. Swindon is therefore has 1/4 of the reported crime in RWB. Admittedly the statistics also include villages around and near to RWB, but then so do the Swindon statistics.[/p][/quote]Nice try there Grumps, you can do a little more of a detailed search regarding RWB and pinpoint the town itself, where in fact there were 47 reported crimes, where as your survey of Swindon was just the town centre with a total 465 reported crimes, if you tap the little icon that says 1 mile radius then the figure jumps to 635 reported crimes lol, if you draw your own map and include the villages( I'm sure they're the ones you meant lol) of Penhill, Park North and South, Pinehurst and the like, that figure climbs to an incredible 1146 reported crimes lol.. So putting false information up to try and prove a point has made you look a bit of a plonker, that's why people move to Royal Wootton Bassett ....Idiot lol Mukkin
  • Score: 0

2:23pm Mon 7 Apr 14

The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man says...

Mukkin wrote:
The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Mukkin wrote:
The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man wrote:
Mukkin wrote:
MrAngry wrote:
mjey wrote:
What's a rubbish.
It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on.
It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks.
Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills.
Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon.
All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.
In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build.

The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.
I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol

Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D
I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it.

Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?
Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D
Good for you, but really?

In February the RWB area had 106 reported crimes from a population of about 11,000. Around 1% of the population therefore reported a crime of some kind in Februrary.

In Swindon during the same time period, 465 crimes were reported from a population of around 200,000 - that's about 0.25% of the population.

Swindon is therefore has 1/4 of the reported crime in RWB. Admittedly the statistics also include villages around and near to RWB, but then so do the Swindon statistics.
Nice try there Grumps, you can do a little more of a detailed search regarding RWB and pinpoint the town itself, where in fact there were 47 reported crimes, where as your survey of Swindon was just the town centre with a total 465 reported crimes, if you tap the little icon that says 1 mile radius then the figure jumps to 635 reported crimes lol, if you draw your own map and include the villages( I'm sure they're the ones you meant lol) of Penhill, Park North and South, Pinehurst and the like, that figure climbs to an incredible 1146 reported crimes lol..

So putting false information up to try and prove a point has made you look a bit of a plonker, that's why people move to Royal Wootton Bassett ....Idiot lol
Vastly larger town in more crimes committed shock!!!

OK, we'll play it your way for a moment. Even if you take it as 1146, that's still only around 0.57% of the population (assuming population of c. 200,000) have reported a crime of some kind in February. This is broadly comparable with more expensive towns such as Oxford. Even if you take a wider view and include the villages surrounding Swindon, it still only takes it to 0.75%, and that's assuming the same population including villages. If we take your figure of 47 for Bassett, that's still 0.4% of the population - not far off being the same.

Penhill, Parks and Pinehurst are not villages. Since you are so superior I'd have thought you'd recognise that.

And for reference the area of Swindon I live in had one reported crime in the same period from a population of approximately 11,500. That's about 0.009% of the local population. By your reasoning I'd assume you'll agree that where I live is far superior to Bassett then, yes?
[quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Mukkin[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]MrAngry[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mjey[/bold] wrote: What's a rubbish. It's Nationwide business to put that rubbishes on. It's a bubble created by the goverment, developers and banks. Just 17% of people in Swindon can afford houses here and stupid things like that are causing higher rents and most people struggle to pay the bills. Another credit crunch is waiting to happen soon. All modern estates are poor quality houses and worthless.[/p][/quote]In many ways, modern houses are better built than the old Victorian ones with shallow foundations and damp problems. Some people think draughty, damp houses with dodgy wiring and wonky walls have character, but I would prefer a new build. The modern estates might be cramped together but the houses aren't worthless.[/p][/quote]I disagree, modern housing going back to the 80's were built on the smallest plots, by the greediest developers ,on the largest estates with no character, yes, you may have a bit of extra insulation, however, listening to your neighbours bonking on a Sunday morning because the walls are so thin isn't my idea of fun lol Plus if you had a cat you definitely couldn't swing it in your postage stamp sized garden :-D[/p][/quote]I have a house in a modern estate. My plot is a decent size, the area is pretty with trees around, and is generally quiet with (mostly) friendly neighbours. I've never heard my neighbours "bonking", and while I not tried swinging my cat (I don't think it would like that much!) I can confirm that I would indeed have room swing a cat in it. Perhaps you just need to buy a better house?[/p][/quote]Have you been round my house, or should I say houses? My house is fantastic thanks, my neighbours quite wonderful, hardly any crime either, but then that's the difference between Swindon and Wootton Bassett ;-D[/p][/quote]Good for you, but really? In February the RWB area had 106 reported crimes from a population of about 11,000. Around 1% of the population therefore reported a crime of some kind in Februrary. In Swindon during the same time period, 465 crimes were reported from a population of around 200,000 - that's about 0.25% of the population. Swindon is therefore has 1/4 of the reported crime in RWB. Admittedly the statistics also include villages around and near to RWB, but then so do the Swindon statistics.[/p][/quote]Nice try there Grumps, you can do a little more of a detailed search regarding RWB and pinpoint the town itself, where in fact there were 47 reported crimes, where as your survey of Swindon was just the town centre with a total 465 reported crimes, if you tap the little icon that says 1 mile radius then the figure jumps to 635 reported crimes lol, if you draw your own map and include the villages( I'm sure they're the ones you meant lol) of Penhill, Park North and South, Pinehurst and the like, that figure climbs to an incredible 1146 reported crimes lol.. So putting false information up to try and prove a point has made you look a bit of a plonker, that's why people move to Royal Wootton Bassett ....Idiot lol[/p][/quote]Vastly larger town in more crimes committed shock!!! OK, we'll play it your way for a moment. Even if you take it as 1146, that's still only around 0.57% of the population (assuming population of c. 200,000) have reported a crime of some kind in February. This is broadly comparable with more expensive towns such as Oxford. Even if you take a wider view and include the villages surrounding Swindon, it still only takes it to 0.75%, and that's assuming the same population including villages. If we take your figure of 47 for Bassett, that's still 0.4% of the population - not far off being the same. Penhill, Parks and Pinehurst are not villages. Since you are so superior I'd have thought you'd recognise that. And for reference the area of Swindon I live in had one reported crime in the same period from a population of approximately 11,500. That's about 0.009% of the local population. By your reasoning I'd assume you'll agree that where I live is far superior to Bassett then, yes? The Artist formally known as Grumpy Old Man
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