Woman discharged with cannula in arm

Georgina Price was discharged from GWH with a cannula still in her arm

Georgina Price was discharged from GWH with a cannula still in her arm

First published in News
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A YOUNG patient was horrified to find a cannula still firmly lodged in her arm when she returned home from the Great Western Hospital.

Georgina Price, of Swindon Town Centre, who suffers from urinary retention, was admitted to hospital after developing a urinary tract infection last Saturday.

After four days she was discharged “summarily”, she claimed, and five minutes after being told she could leave, she was out of the door.

It is only when she reached her town centre home that she noticed her nurses had failed to make routine checks and remove the tube hooked into a vein in her left arm.

Georgina is now asking a formal apology from the hospital and urging staff to treat patients like her with the care and consideration they deserve in the future.

The 27-year-old said: “I got home at 11am and that’s when I noticed it. I had an endoscopy at the hospital and they put the cannula in to give me sedation. I didn’t feel it because I’m so used to it and it wasn’t hurting.”

“I am just so angry that they didn’t make any of the checks they were supposed to. It’s a really basic thing. They do it every single day.

“I just feel like they couldn’t wait to get me out of there. I was rushed. They brought in the discharge papers and I was out in five minutes. I want an apology.”

Georgina had to wait until a nurse visited her that evening to have it removed safely.

Due to her condition, the former carer has been admitted to hospital several times already this year, to have the catheter attached to her bladder replaced, or to be treated for infections.

She is due for another catheter change on Tuesday but is now concerned about returning to GWH.

“I feel like they don’t really care,” she added.

“And if they can do it to me they can do it to other people. It could have been dangerous. This is not a way to treat patients and it’s not reassuring for next time.

“They need to be more careful and look after vulnerable people properly. We are not cattle, we are people.”

Each year the Department of Health receives reports of patients discharged with cannulae still in their arms or hands.

In the UK such events are considered serious enough to fall under the department’s ‘never events’ policy and can lead to nurses being disciplined.

No-one at the Great Western Hospital was available for comment.

Comments (24)

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7:44am Sat 19 Jul 14

Concerned of Wiltshire says...

I've modified what I was otherwise going to post since reading about the need for a mental care nurse. But I'll still tell you Georgina that my son is six and has a cannula in him every day of his life and he doesn't moan about it.
I've modified what I was otherwise going to post since reading about the need for a mental care nurse. But I'll still tell you Georgina that my son is six and has a cannula in him every day of his life and he doesn't moan about it. Concerned of Wiltshire
  • Score: 44

7:45am Sat 19 Jul 14

bellyup says...

Why cant she take some responsibility for herself by leaving the hospital with it in her arm? So concerned about cannula in arm called the Adver for a quick photo session before getting it removed. In and out in 5 minutes? That's pretty impressive nowadays. I really hope no nurses get disciplined in this case. An honest mistake, not life or death. If you're going up the hospital twice a week you know the routine & getting a very good free service for your condition. If your that worried about going back then go private!
Why cant she take some responsibility for herself by leaving the hospital with it in her arm? So concerned about cannula in arm called the Adver for a quick photo session before getting it removed. In and out in 5 minutes? That's pretty impressive nowadays. I really hope no nurses get disciplined in this case. An honest mistake, not life or death. If you're going up the hospital twice a week you know the routine & getting a very good free service for your condition. If your that worried about going back then go private! bellyup
  • Score: 63

9:30am Sat 19 Jul 14

girlygirl1 says...

Totally agree with the above post. If the cannula went in whilst she was in endoscopy, the ward discharging may not have been fully aware and so wouldn't have made it a priority. If I had a cannula in my arm, id make sure I told someone before I left. Hardly life or death. People sometimes do need to take responsibility for themselves. If you had enough time to have your picture taken you got enough time to turn around and get the cannula taken out at the hospital.
Totally agree with the above post. If the cannula went in whilst she was in endoscopy, the ward discharging may not have been fully aware and so wouldn't have made it a priority. If I had a cannula in my arm, id make sure I told someone before I left. Hardly life or death. People sometimes do need to take responsibility for themselves. If you had enough time to have your picture taken you got enough time to turn around and get the cannula taken out at the hospital. girlygirl1
  • Score: 48

11:19am Sat 19 Jul 14

Robh says...

“I just feel like they couldn’t wait to get me out of there. I was rushed. They brought in the discharge papers and I was out in five minutes. I want an apology.”

The apology reads we are sorry that you were stupid enough to leave hospital with a cannula still in your arm etc.etc.
“I just feel like they couldn’t wait to get me out of there. I was rushed. They brought in the discharge papers and I was out in five minutes. I want an apology.” The apology reads we are sorry that you were stupid enough to leave hospital with a cannula still in your arm etc.etc. Robh
  • Score: 42

12:26pm Sat 19 Jul 14

Sarah-jane12 says...

Ridiculous....my daughter has a terminal illness and has had so many of these so she too is used to it....but she never forgets it is there for goodness sake. They are uncomfortable and you would notice as you wouldn't be able to bend your arm easily. Grow up, you should have pointed it out yourself.
Ridiculous....my daughter has a terminal illness and has had so many of these so she too is used to it....but she never forgets it is there for goodness sake. They are uncomfortable and you would notice as you wouldn't be able to bend your arm easily. Grow up, you should have pointed it out yourself. Sarah-jane12
  • Score: 42

1:20pm Sat 19 Jul 14

MrAngry says...

I am sure this happens all the time. I was discharged from hospital a few weeks ago and had 2 cannulae in my hand. I pointed it out to the nurse, she smiled and removed them.

Simple mistake and definitely not something I would run to the Adver with or make an official complaint about.

It was removed the same day by a mental health so not really a big problem. Alternatively, she could have gone to a walk in centre and had it removed straightaway.
I am sure this happens all the time. I was discharged from hospital a few weeks ago and had 2 cannulae in my hand. I pointed it out to the nurse, she smiled and removed them. Simple mistake and definitely not something I would run to the Adver with or make an official complaint about. It was removed the same day by a mental health so not really a big problem. Alternatively, she could have gone to a walk in centre and had it removed straightaway. MrAngry
  • Score: 34

3:27pm Sat 19 Jul 14

redrum says...

This once happened when a patient returned to my care, however they could not speak so would of been unable to say. I am not making excuses as yes this should of been checked, however you have a voice and had you gone to a walk in clinic or contacted the out of hours service this may of been removed sooner. We are all human after all and I understand you wanting an apology, however please consider how many hours healthcare staff work, often with little breaks and many patients. I am sure a letter from you would of made then extra aware about checking these things rather than going through the media. I wish you a speedy recovery.
This once happened when a patient returned to my care, however they could not speak so would of been unable to say. I am not making excuses as yes this should of been checked, however you have a voice and had you gone to a walk in clinic or contacted the out of hours service this may of been removed sooner. We are all human after all and I understand you wanting an apology, however please consider how many hours healthcare staff work, often with little breaks and many patients. I am sure a letter from you would of made then extra aware about checking these things rather than going through the media. I wish you a speedy recovery. redrum
  • Score: 26

3:46pm Sat 19 Jul 14

Jonoo70 says...

Shocked this has even made the news. No doubt the apology will require a postage stamp what a waste of public money that could be spent on treatment of people who are not fit to be discharged.
Shocked this has even made the news. No doubt the apology will require a postage stamp what a waste of public money that could be spent on treatment of people who are not fit to be discharged. Jonoo70
  • Score: 34

4:25pm Sat 19 Jul 14

Sandor Clegane says...


“I feel like they don’t really care”


Rather an odd, not to mention ungrateful, statement from a person who's used the NHS 50 times this year and is provided with a mental health nurse.
[quote] “I feel like they don’t really care” [/quote] Rather an odd, not to mention ungrateful, statement from a person who's used the NHS 50 times this year and is provided with a mental health nurse. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 37

5:39pm Sat 19 Jul 14

FlowerPower says...

I've been discharged twice with a cannula in. Once from GWH, once from Southampton. Both times I have simply removed them myself. If you've spent large amounts of time in hospital then you soon learn how these things are done. I certainly have never run crying to the paper!!!

I don't blame the nurses. I was as keen to get out, as they were to free up a bed for a person who needed it more. I forgot. Cannot blame them for doing the same. I had less excuse, After all it was my arm it was stuck in.

Yes it should have been removed but for goodness sake, nurses are only human. No long term damage done. Or even damage risked. Unlike being told they can't discharge you until you have had your insulin..... when you know very well you don't have insulin. I didn't run to the press then either. I spoke to the nurse and questioned them. They soon checked and apologised for the mistake. I accepted the apology, accepted the assurance that the incident would be investigated to ensure it didn't reoccur and went home to the comfort of my own bed.

Simples
I've been discharged twice with a cannula in. Once from GWH, once from Southampton. Both times I have simply removed them myself. If you've spent large amounts of time in hospital then you soon learn how these things are done. I certainly have never run crying to the paper!!! I don't blame the nurses. I was as keen to get out, as they were to free up a bed for a person who needed it more. I forgot. Cannot blame them for doing the same. I had less excuse, After all it was my arm it was stuck in. Yes it should have been removed but for goodness sake, nurses are only human. No long term damage done. Or even damage risked. Unlike being told they can't discharge you until you have had your insulin..... when you know very well you don't have insulin. I didn't run to the press then either. I spoke to the nurse and questioned them. They soon checked and apologised for the mistake. I accepted the apology, accepted the assurance that the incident would be investigated to ensure it didn't reoccur and went home to the comfort of my own bed. Simples FlowerPower
  • Score: 22

9:15pm Sat 19 Jul 14

underdogs says...

If the department of health class this as a ' Never Event ' then clearly it is a very serious matter or else it would not be so classified ! It is sad to see so many of those commenting appear to readily accept sub standard care and ' never events ' occurring in our hospitals now and think patients should not complain - acceptance of these matters as being part of the usual standards in our hospitals will only lead to further declines in the services being provided . Personally, I wish to congratulate the adver and Georgina for telling this story - and isnt it a sign of the times that the hospital refuses to comment, apologise or offer the people of swindon any reassurances ? Lack of effective management !
If the department of health class this as a ' Never Event ' then clearly it is a very serious matter or else it would not be so classified ! It is sad to see so many of those commenting appear to readily accept sub standard care and ' never events ' occurring in our hospitals now and think patients should not complain - acceptance of these matters as being part of the usual standards in our hospitals will only lead to further declines in the services being provided . Personally, I wish to congratulate the adver and Georgina for telling this story - and isnt it a sign of the times that the hospital refuses to comment, apologise or offer the people of swindon any reassurances ? Lack of effective management ! underdogs
  • Score: -28

7:44am Sun 20 Jul 14

house on the hill says...

girlygirl1 wrote:
Totally agree with the above post. If the cannula went in whilst she was in endoscopy, the ward discharging may not have been fully aware and so wouldn't have made it a priority. If I had a cannula in my arm, id make sure I told someone before I left. Hardly life or death. People sometimes do need to take responsibility for themselves. If you had enough time to have your picture taken you got enough time to turn around and get the cannula taken out at the hospital.
Absolutely, who leaves with it still in there. Either really stupid or wanted to make something from it. no doubt a compensation claim will be forthcoming from one of those ambulance chasing firms!
[quote][p][bold]girlygirl1[/bold] wrote: Totally agree with the above post. If the cannula went in whilst she was in endoscopy, the ward discharging may not have been fully aware and so wouldn't have made it a priority. If I had a cannula in my arm, id make sure I told someone before I left. Hardly life or death. People sometimes do need to take responsibility for themselves. If you had enough time to have your picture taken you got enough time to turn around and get the cannula taken out at the hospital.[/p][/quote]Absolutely, who leaves with it still in there. Either really stupid or wanted to make something from it. no doubt a compensation claim will be forthcoming from one of those ambulance chasing firms! house on the hill
  • Score: 31

8:34am Sun 20 Jul 14

girlygirl1 says...

underdogs wrote:
If the department of health class this as a ' Never Event ' then clearly it is a very serious matter or else it would not be so classified ! It is sad to see so many of those commenting appear to readily accept sub standard care and ' never events ' occurring in our hospitals now and think patients should not complain - acceptance of these matters as being part of the usual standards in our hospitals will only lead to further declines in the services being provided . Personally, I wish to congratulate the adver and Georgina for telling this story - and isnt it a sign of the times that the hospital refuses to comment, apologise or offer the people of swindon any reassurances ? Lack of effective management !
A never event can be a retained swab, wrong site surgery etc... They may state its a never event however its also common sense on the patients side also. This could have been easily rectified by her simply showing or telling the nurse. People are quick to judge the NHS however if one of us were dying and they saved our life. I wouldn't be complaining about anything. Simply give some praise. Common sense goes a long way!!
[quote][p][bold]underdogs[/bold] wrote: If the department of health class this as a ' Never Event ' then clearly it is a very serious matter or else it would not be so classified ! It is sad to see so many of those commenting appear to readily accept sub standard care and ' never events ' occurring in our hospitals now and think patients should not complain - acceptance of these matters as being part of the usual standards in our hospitals will only lead to further declines in the services being provided . Personally, I wish to congratulate the adver and Georgina for telling this story - and isnt it a sign of the times that the hospital refuses to comment, apologise or offer the people of swindon any reassurances ? Lack of effective management ![/p][/quote]A never event can be a retained swab, wrong site surgery etc... They may state its a never event however its also common sense on the patients side also. This could have been easily rectified by her simply showing or telling the nurse. People are quick to judge the NHS however if one of us were dying and they saved our life. I wouldn't be complaining about anything. Simply give some praise. Common sense goes a long way!! girlygirl1
  • Score: 19

11:09am Sun 20 Jul 14

MrAngry says...

underdogs wrote:
If the department of health class this as a ' Never Event ' then clearly it is a very serious matter or else it would not be so classified ! It is sad to see so many of those commenting appear to readily accept sub standard care and ' never events ' occurring in our hospitals now and think patients should not complain - acceptance of these matters as being part of the usual standards in our hospitals will only lead to further declines in the services being provided . Personally, I wish to congratulate the adver and Georgina for telling this story - and isnt it a sign of the times that the hospital refuses to comment, apologise or offer the people of swindon any reassurances ? Lack of effective management !
Having read NHS guidelines on 'never events', I am not convinced that this meets the criteria.

The cannula potentially falls under the Retained Foreign Object category except that this definition specifically excludes 'items that are inserted during the procedure but are intentionally retained after completion of the procedure, with removal planned for a later time or date'.

Most of the never events involve death or serious injury, eg. falling out of windows, or incorrect drugs administered.

The NHS is underfunded and is not perfect, but it is FREE. Wasting time investigating minor events, disciplining staff for small errors and writing apologies is only going to make the problem worse. If the NHS sacked the managers monitoring and investigating trivial incidents they could employ more nurses and these events would be less likely to happen.
[quote][p][bold]underdogs[/bold] wrote: If the department of health class this as a ' Never Event ' then clearly it is a very serious matter or else it would not be so classified ! It is sad to see so many of those commenting appear to readily accept sub standard care and ' never events ' occurring in our hospitals now and think patients should not complain - acceptance of these matters as being part of the usual standards in our hospitals will only lead to further declines in the services being provided . Personally, I wish to congratulate the adver and Georgina for telling this story - and isnt it a sign of the times that the hospital refuses to comment, apologise or offer the people of swindon any reassurances ? Lack of effective management ![/p][/quote]Having read NHS guidelines on 'never events', I am not convinced that this meets the criteria. The cannula potentially falls under the Retained Foreign Object category except that this definition specifically excludes 'items that are inserted during the procedure but are intentionally retained after completion of the procedure, with removal planned for a later time or date'. Most of the never events involve death or serious injury, eg. falling out of windows, or incorrect drugs administered. The NHS is underfunded and is not perfect, but it is FREE. Wasting time investigating minor events, disciplining staff for small errors and writing apologies is only going to make the problem worse. If the NHS sacked the managers monitoring and investigating trivial incidents they could employ more nurses and these events would be less likely to happen. MrAngry
  • Score: 17

2:27pm Sun 20 Jul 14

South Stand says...

Surely an extremely large amount of compensation is due to the hospital. Why? because this woman walked out of hospital with some of its equipment.
How can you not notice that you have that sticking out of your arm?
Surely an extremely large amount of compensation is due to the hospital. Why? because this woman walked out of hospital with some of its equipment. How can you not notice that you have that sticking out of your arm? South Stand
  • Score: 13

4:16pm Sun 20 Jul 14

patient 2014 says...

I have known this person for many years and she didn't do it for a quick photo shoot or for anything else other than to show this is what can happen as they are in a rush to get people out of hospital as the hospital isn't big enough for the population. Please before people want to get nasty maybe you know the person first. This was in swicc unit not the hospital it's self. She did take it out herself. Also for the person who said she was being treated opposite her 2 weeks ago I think you will find she hasn't been in hospital for morphine in the last 2 weeks so I think you she get the information right. It's bit like she has got anything out of doing this storey other than to warn people of what can happen. She's been under the hospital for 4 years with different things that have been going on and I know she will phrase the Gwh for what they have done for her. They have saved her life more then once given her blood transfusions when needed. So maybe all of you should think before you start ****. Once again this was in the swicc unit not the hospital it's self!!!
I have known this person for many years and she didn't do it for a quick photo shoot or for anything else other than to show this is what can happen as they are in a rush to get people out of hospital as the hospital isn't big enough for the population. Please before people want to get nasty maybe you know the person first. This was in swicc unit not the hospital it's self. She did take it out herself. Also for the person who said she was being treated opposite her 2 weeks ago I think you will find she hasn't been in hospital for morphine in the last 2 weeks so I think you she get the information right. It's bit like she has got anything out of doing this storey other than to warn people of what can happen. She's been under the hospital for 4 years with different things that have been going on and I know she will phrase the Gwh for what they have done for her. They have saved her life more then once given her blood transfusions when needed. So maybe all of you should think before you start ****. Once again this was in the swicc unit not the hospital it's self!!! patient 2014
  • Score: -20

4:21pm Sun 20 Jul 14

patient 2014 says...

Also I do believe she has been on the phone to the papers and told them they have made a mistake and that it wasn't in the Gwh it's self and that it was in the swicc unit. Have none of you thought before you typed any of this of how she would be feeling if she reads any of this? She has feeling's and some of the things you have all said can be taken in different ways. Also yes she may be under the mental health but none of you know what she has been through or what she is going through.
Also I do believe she has been on the phone to the papers and told them they have made a mistake and that it wasn't in the Gwh it's self and that it was in the swicc unit. Have none of you thought before you typed any of this of how she would be feeling if she reads any of this? She has feeling's and some of the things you have all said can be taken in different ways. Also yes she may be under the mental health but none of you know what she has been through or what she is going through. patient 2014
  • Score: -23

5:34pm Sun 20 Jul 14

bellyup says...

You don't need to know everyone's background before you reply. Here's a person who receives regular treatment on the NHS so some visits will be better than others. In hospital for four days then told you can go and suddenly you've gone-how is that not caring? Instead of sending a complaint letter, how about a bunch of flowers for the ward that looked after you and will continue to no doubt.
You don't need to know everyone's background before you reply. Here's a person who receives regular treatment on the NHS so some visits will be better than others. In hospital for four days then told you can go and suddenly you've gone-how is that not caring? Instead of sending a complaint letter, how about a bunch of flowers for the ward that looked after you and will continue to no doubt. bellyup
  • Score: 14

8:10pm Sun 20 Jul 14

semitonic says...

This woman is clearly an attention-seeking idiot, but wait...

MrAngry says... "The NHS is underfunded and is not perfect, but it is FREE. "

The NHS is NOT free. It is paid for by ordinary working people who have NI contributions removed from their wages every month, without choice.

Nothing is 'free' FFS it all has to be paid for, usually by people who don't go running to the adver because they haven't had top-rank service 50 times this year already.
This woman is clearly an attention-seeking idiot, but wait... MrAngry says... "The NHS is underfunded and is not perfect, but it is FREE. " The NHS is NOT free. It is paid for by ordinary working people who have NI contributions removed from their wages every month, without choice. Nothing is 'free' FFS it all has to be paid for, usually by people who don't go running to the adver because they haven't had top-rank service 50 times this year already. semitonic
  • Score: 11

11:37pm Sun 20 Jul 14

saul1664 says...

SWICC isn't part of the NHS.
SWICC isn't part of the NHS. saul1664
  • Score: 0

9:41am Mon 21 Jul 14

MrAngry says...

semitonic wrote:
This woman is clearly an attention-seeking idiot, but wait...

MrAngry says... "The NHS is underfunded and is not perfect, but it is FREE. "

The NHS is NOT free. It is paid for by ordinary working people who have NI contributions removed from their wages every month, without choice.

Nothing is 'free' FFS it all has to be paid for, usually by people who don't go running to the adver because they haven't had top-rank service 50 times this year already.
Free at the point of use.

An adequate service funded by tax payers which would be more expensive if perfect. If people want a better service, pay to go private and then they complain all they like.
[quote][p][bold]semitonic[/bold] wrote: This woman is clearly an attention-seeking idiot, but wait... MrAngry says... "The NHS is underfunded and is not perfect, but it is FREE. " The NHS is NOT free. It is paid for by ordinary working people who have NI contributions removed from their wages every month, without choice. Nothing is 'free' FFS it all has to be paid for, usually by people who don't go running to the adver because they haven't had top-rank service 50 times this year already.[/p][/quote]Free at the point of use. An adequate service funded by tax payers which would be more expensive if perfect. If people want a better service, pay to go private and then they complain all they like. MrAngry
  • Score: 2

10:05pm Mon 21 Jul 14

Chicken legs says...

Perhaps this young lady should tell the whole story!, perhaps she should mention her abusive behaviour, the threatening behaviour, the vile language which was used during her stay within Gwh?, after all there is a zero tolerance policy!
Perhaps this young lady should tell the whole story!, perhaps she should mention her abusive behaviour, the threatening behaviour, the vile language which was used during her stay within Gwh?, after all there is a zero tolerance policy! Chicken legs
  • Score: 6

11:07am Tue 22 Jul 14

Tigger1991 says...

It obviously was such a huge problem that before it could even be removed there was time for the Adver to come round, take pictures and make a report/ account of the event. For someone who frequents the use of NHS services on a regular basis for whatever reason; using many different services- this patient is more than aware that the venflon (cannula) that was left in situ after her visit does no contain a sharp and is very easily removed and with a bit of pressure over the site once removed to stop the bleeding...job done! Regardless as to whether it was SWICC or GWH this cannula is situated in a very obvious place, I find it hard to believe you'd fail to notice it still being in situ prior to your discharge. The removal of a cannula via a non sterile technique does slightly heighten the risk of infection- but that risk is miniscule as the venflon would have been used and cared for in the correct manner during the stay.

If all you have to complain about is a cannula being left in your arm then maybe you want to look at the bigger picture in the NHS- having worked in the NHS for over 6 years we are in crisis but it doesn't prevent us all as health care professionals to carry out our roles to the best and highest standard and ability possible. Mistakes are made, accidents happen and simple things get forgot but each an every ward at GWH and within the SWICC centre are bursting; there is a bed crisis, you are just one of many patients, you're obviously not silly otherwise you wouldn't have gone to the Adver; use some of your common sense and deal with the situation in a far more productive manner!!

I work within pre-hospital emergency medicine for the ambulance service; we are massively over stretched NHS but it doesn't stop us doing the best by our patients and their families....lets hear some positive feedback rather then petti stories regarding a venflon that could have been removed yourself!!

Put things into perspective- you are a very well person compared to many of the patients I deal with on a daily basis. Take some responsibility; nurses are stretched enough as it is- all you have to do it ask and they will remove it.
It obviously was such a huge problem that before it could even be removed there was time for the Adver to come round, take pictures and make a report/ account of the event. For someone who frequents the use of NHS services on a regular basis for whatever reason; using many different services- this patient is more than aware that the venflon (cannula) that was left in situ after her visit does no contain a sharp and is very easily removed and with a bit of pressure over the site once removed to stop the bleeding...job done! Regardless as to whether it was SWICC or GWH this cannula is situated in a very obvious place, I find it hard to believe you'd fail to notice it still being in situ prior to your discharge. The removal of a cannula via a non sterile technique does slightly heighten the risk of infection- but that risk is miniscule as the venflon would have been used and cared for in the correct manner during the stay. If all you have to complain about is a cannula being left in your arm then maybe you want to look at the bigger picture in the NHS- having worked in the NHS for over 6 years we are in crisis but it doesn't prevent us all as health care professionals to carry out our roles to the best and highest standard and ability possible. Mistakes are made, accidents happen and simple things get forgot but each an every ward at GWH and within the SWICC centre are bursting; there is a bed crisis, you are just one of many patients, you're obviously not silly otherwise you wouldn't have gone to the Adver; use some of your common sense and deal with the situation in a far more productive manner!! I work within pre-hospital emergency medicine for the ambulance service; we are massively over stretched NHS but it doesn't stop us doing the best by our patients and their families....lets hear some positive feedback rather then petti stories regarding a venflon that could have been removed yourself!! Put things into perspective- you are a very well person compared to many of the patients I deal with on a daily basis. Take some responsibility; nurses are stretched enough as it is- all you have to do it ask and they will remove it. Tigger1991
  • Score: 7

12:05pm Tue 22 Jul 14

Chicken legs says...

Beautifully said Tigger1991
Beautifully said Tigger1991 Chicken legs
  • Score: 1

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