Scheme gets across the crime message

Beat manager Steve Yeates with the new software that will enable people to check crime updates

Beat manager Steve Yeates with the new software that will enable people to check crime updates

First published in News by

INSTANT alerts are now available for West Swindon residents to engage with their local police force, as the pilot Wiltshire and Swindon Community Messaging Scheme launches today.

West Swindon, along with Malmesbury, Pewsey and Warminster, are the first four neighbourhood policing areas going live with Wiltshire and Swindon Community Messaging.

People signed up will be able to receive messages about policing and crime matters in their area, such as community policing news and events, appeals for information and crime prevention advice.

They will also be able to reply to messages, feeding back information to their local neighbourhood officers to help them in policing their local area.

People who live or work outside these areas can still sign up and they will receive messages as and when their area neighbourhood policing team starts to use Community Messaging.

PCC Angus Macpherson, who is commissioning the new initiative, said: “Both myself and Chief Constable Pat Geenty are committed to involving communities in the prevention and reduction of crime and anti-social behaviour, in line with priorities in my Police and Crime Plan and the Force Delivery Plan.

“Wiltshire and Swindon Community Messaging is an exciting new system allowing the police to send emails, texts and voicemail messages to those signed up. It means we will be able to share information quickly and efficiently with our communities, including Neighbourhood Watch coordinators and members.”

Wiltshire Police Chief Constable Pat Geenty said: “This is an additional tool with lots of potential for us to use to engage, inform and involve our communities in policing and crime matters. This is in line with our ethos to see pro-active, preventative policing becoming a permanent feature within Wiltshire Police and involving communities and more volunteers in policing and crime related issues."

West Swindon Inspector Martyn Sweet said: “The way it works is a two-way messaging system between Neighbourhood Watch teams and the police. In due course other partners will also be able to engage in the process.

“We can send an alert out to groups of houses as appropriate, and within five seconds a message can be blasted out to a particular area or street.

“That encourages a bit of two- way feedback, both from ourselves and from the Neighbourhood Watch teams. We are then developing and improving community intelligence.

“The whole thing will be co-ordinated from the neighbourhood alert website. Our crime issues go across boundaries so they can link into that.”

Insp Sweet stressed that no funds would be diverted to pay for the scheme. “There is going to be no cost to affect resources on the front line of policing,” he said.

To join Wiltshire and Swindon Community Messaging or to find out more visit www.wiltsmessaging.co.uk.

Wiltshire and Swindon Community Messaging will not be monitored 24 hours a day. People should always call 999 in an emergency or 101 in a non-emergency.

The West Swindon neighbourhood policing team will be holding a session outside the Link Centre on Thursday from 10am to midday to demonstrate the service and help people sign up.

Comments (18)

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7:24am Mon 18 Aug 14

Mango man says...

Basically Facebook, or very similar!
Basically Facebook, or very similar! Mango man
  • Score: 1

8:49am Mon 18 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

One of the main problems is the expectation level of the public that the police can respond to every event and investigate as fully as they would expect. With the limited numbers and resources we have that is never going to happen and we must get real. That isn't to say that the police could not be run more efficiently, but they will never be able to do what the public really wants. But yes the public can do more to help, but as we know a lot will never tell the police anything even if they know things as they are seen as the "enemy" until of course they need them then they are the first to complain.
One of the main problems is the expectation level of the public that the police can respond to every event and investigate as fully as they would expect. With the limited numbers and resources we have that is never going to happen and we must get real. That isn't to say that the police could not be run more efficiently, but they will never be able to do what the public really wants. But yes the public can do more to help, but as we know a lot will never tell the police anything even if they know things as they are seen as the "enemy" until of course they need them then they are the first to complain. house on the hill
  • Score: 3

10:06am Mon 18 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court.

All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.
Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court. All a complete waste of everyone's time and money. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 8

10:24am Mon 18 Aug 14

messyits says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court.

All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.
Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court. All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.[/p][/quote]Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law. messyits
  • Score: -12

10:58am Mon 18 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

messyits wrote:
Sandor Clegane wrote:
Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court.

All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.
Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.
Judges still have too much "discretion" and it tends to be more about how full the prisons are than the law in far too many cases. And then when they do convict and lock them up some politician comes along and lets them out early because the prisons are overcrowded.

you would have though that would have set alarm bells ringing that whatever we are doing it clearly isn't working as numbers rise so how is letting people out early going to help? Build more prisons and give proper sentences that reflect the true impact of the crime on the victims and the wider society rather than seeing the criminal as the victim. No one has any faith in the system anymore.
[quote][p][bold]messyits[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court. All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.[/p][/quote]Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.[/p][/quote]Judges still have too much "discretion" and it tends to be more about how full the prisons are than the law in far too many cases. And then when they do convict and lock them up some politician comes along and lets them out early because the prisons are overcrowded. you would have though that would have set alarm bells ringing that whatever we are doing it clearly isn't working as numbers rise so how is letting people out early going to help? Build more prisons and give proper sentences that reflect the true impact of the crime on the victims and the wider society rather than seeing the criminal as the victim. No one has any faith in the system anymore. house on the hill
  • Score: 6

11:19am Mon 18 Aug 14

Hmmmf says...

Another excellent means of distancing the police from the people on their patch. Not content with merely driving past their communities, now they can sit behind a screen and still claim to be 'in touch'. How much is this scheme costing the taxpayer, and would it be cheaper to outsource the screens to Bangalore?
According to this article: http://goo.gl/9XM4uR frontline police officers spend more than half their duty time 'on social media' as it is!
Another excellent means of distancing the police from the people on their patch. Not content with merely driving past their communities, now they can sit behind a screen and still claim to be 'in touch'. How much is this scheme costing the taxpayer, and would it be cheaper to outsource the screens to Bangalore? According to this article: http://goo.gl/9XM4uR frontline police officers spend more than half their duty time 'on social media' as it is! Hmmmf
  • Score: 4

11:26am Mon 18 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

messyits wrote:
Sandor Clegane wrote:
Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court.

All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.
Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.
Very few, other than those with vested interests, such as yourself, believe this kind of soundbite defence that's always trotted out.

Too many judges have been caught out, too many mistakes, far too many unduly lenient sentences.

The public have little to no faith left in the judiciary, and it's not hard to see why that situation has arisen - and who caused it.
[quote][p][bold]messyits[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court. All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.[/p][/quote]Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.[/p][/quote]Very few, other than those with vested interests, such as yourself, believe this kind of soundbite defence that's always trotted out. Too many judges have been caught out, too many mistakes, far too many unduly lenient sentences. The public have little to no faith left in the judiciary, and it's not hard to see why that situation has arisen - and who caused it. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 5

11:40am Mon 18 Aug 14

messyits says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
messyits wrote:
Sandor Clegane wrote:
Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court.

All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.
Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.
Very few, other than those with vested interests, such as yourself, believe this kind of soundbite defence that's always trotted out.

Too many judges have been caught out, too many mistakes, far too many unduly lenient sentences.

The public have little to no faith left in the judiciary, and it's not hard to see why that situation has arisen - and who caused it.
Silly man--if a judge--or magistrate makes a mistake--either way--an appeal would be launched.
Do spend a few days following a case and attend the sentencing phase where the Judge/Magistrate listens to legal argument and social reports prior to sentencing--you might actually learn something.
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]messyits[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: Police keep arresting some criminals, the courts convict them and then the judges allow them to stroll free from court. All a complete waste of everyone's time and money.[/p][/quote]Judges have better information than you and sentence taking ALL the facts and reports into consideration. As required by law.[/p][/quote]Very few, other than those with vested interests, such as yourself, believe this kind of soundbite defence that's always trotted out. Too many judges have been caught out, too many mistakes, far too many unduly lenient sentences. The public have little to no faith left in the judiciary, and it's not hard to see why that situation has arisen - and who caused it.[/p][/quote]Silly man--if a judge--or magistrate makes a mistake--either way--an appeal would be launched. Do spend a few days following a case and attend the sentencing phase where the Judge/Magistrate listens to legal argument and social reports prior to sentencing--you might actually learn something. messyits
  • Score: -9

11:58am Mon 18 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

Unlike you, I've spent many hours in numerous courts to observe the behaviour of various judges. It's just one reason I'm far more aware of what goes on than you clearly are.

If you continue to insist on commenting on things you know little about, I would suggest you consult the publically available information with regards to appeals made by both defence teams and the CPS.

Still, no point arguing with you, your bias on this subject and condescending attitude doesn't phase me in the slightest and it's clear that everyone here knows you merely argue for the sake of it. Likely due to boredom but it does also tend to highlight an unfortunate character flaw in you.
Unlike you, I've spent many hours in numerous courts to observe the behaviour of various judges. It's just one reason I'm far more aware of what goes on than you clearly are. If you continue to insist on commenting on things you know little about, I would suggest you consult the publically available information with regards to appeals made by both defence teams and the CPS. Still, no point arguing with you, your bias on this subject and condescending attitude doesn't phase me in the slightest and it's clear that everyone here knows you merely argue for the sake of it. Likely due to boredom but it does also tend to highlight an unfortunate character flaw in you. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 6

1:35pm Mon 18 Aug 14

messyits says...

Unlike you, I've spent many hours in numerous courts to observe the behaviour of various judges. It's just one reason I'm far more aware of what goes on than you clearly are.

Does that mean you have a qualification to that effect? You would certainly know Judge Fields peculiarity just before passing sentence then?

If you continue to insist on commenting on things you know little about, I would suggest you consult the publically available information with regards to appeals made by both defence teams and the CPS

Publicly you meant? Firstly--the general rule is an appeal is made to a higher court and other than that no information can be published that could prejudice that appeal.

Still, no point arguing with you, your bias on this subject and condescending attitude doesn't phase me in the slightest and it's clear that everyone here knows you merely argue for the sake of it. Likely due to boredom but it does also tend to highlight an unfortunate character flaw in you.

You are the one who argues and I have no bias either way. I am rarely bored and proud to have a QC of repute in the family--I have no so called character flaws or i would not be in the job I do.

This scheme could work provided the time wasters keep away.
Unlike you, I've spent many hours in numerous courts to observe the behaviour of various judges. It's just one reason I'm far more aware of what goes on than you clearly are. Does that mean you have a qualification to that effect? You would certainly know Judge Fields peculiarity just before passing sentence then? If you continue to insist on commenting on things you know little about, I would suggest you consult the publically available information with regards to appeals made by both defence teams and the CPS Publicly you meant? Firstly--the general rule is an appeal is made to a higher court and other than that no information can be published that could prejudice that appeal. Still, no point arguing with you, your bias on this subject and condescending attitude doesn't phase me in the slightest and it's clear that everyone here knows you merely argue for the sake of it. Likely due to boredom but it does also tend to highlight an unfortunate character flaw in you. You are the one who argues and I have no bias either way. I am rarely bored and proud to have a QC of repute in the family--I have no so called character flaws or i would not be in the job I do. This scheme could work provided the time wasters keep away. messyits
  • Score: -4

1:56pm Mon 18 Aug 14

house on the hill says...

messyits wrote:
Unlike you, I've spent many hours in numerous courts to observe the behaviour of various judges. It's just one reason I'm far more aware of what goes on than you clearly are.

Does that mean you have a qualification to that effect? You would certainly know Judge Fields peculiarity just before passing sentence then?

If you continue to insist on commenting on things you know little about, I would suggest you consult the publically available information with regards to appeals made by both defence teams and the CPS

Publicly you meant? Firstly--the general rule is an appeal is made to a higher court and other than that no information can be published that could prejudice that appeal.

Still, no point arguing with you, your bias on this subject and condescending attitude doesn't phase me in the slightest and it's clear that everyone here knows you merely argue for the sake of it. Likely due to boredom but it does also tend to highlight an unfortunate character flaw in you.

You are the one who argues and I have no bias either way. I am rarely bored and proud to have a QC of repute in the family--I have no so called character flaws or i would not be in the job I do.

This scheme could work provided the time wasters keep away.
So what would you do reduce crime and the numbers in prison?
[quote][p][bold]messyits[/bold] wrote: Unlike you, I've spent many hours in numerous courts to observe the behaviour of various judges. It's just one reason I'm far more aware of what goes on than you clearly are. Does that mean you have a qualification to that effect? You would certainly know Judge Fields peculiarity just before passing sentence then? If you continue to insist on commenting on things you know little about, I would suggest you consult the publically available information with regards to appeals made by both defence teams and the CPS Publicly you meant? Firstly--the general rule is an appeal is made to a higher court and other than that no information can be published that could prejudice that appeal. Still, no point arguing with you, your bias on this subject and condescending attitude doesn't phase me in the slightest and it's clear that everyone here knows you merely argue for the sake of it. Likely due to boredom but it does also tend to highlight an unfortunate character flaw in you. You are the one who argues and I have no bias either way. I am rarely bored and proud to have a QC of repute in the family--I have no so called character flaws or i would not be in the job I do. This scheme could work provided the time wasters keep away.[/p][/quote]So what would you do reduce crime and the numbers in prison? house on the hill
  • Score: 4

2:48pm Mon 18 Aug 14

messyits says...

I can only suggest we follow some of the Asian penal systems and laws.
I can only suggest we follow some of the Asian penal systems and laws. messyits
  • Score: -5

3:02pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

@messyits: http://www.collinsdi
ctionary.com/diction
ary/english/publical
ly
@messyits: http://www.collinsdi ctionary.com/diction ary/english/publical ly Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 2

3:11pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

If you are going to erroneously attempt to score points by referencing grammar, it's best to at least avoid very common and basic errors yourself.


You would certainly know Judge Fields peculiarity just before passing sentence then?


Do inform us as to your apostrophe key being rendered inoperative due to use of American technology, or some such ridiculous attempt at an excuse for your glaring error.


I have no so called character flaws


Oh, they are clear to anyone who has had the misfortune of reading your ramblings here. 'So called' could also do with a hypen, something you seem to use very generously when not appropriate but have omitted where preferred.

If you'd like any further assistance with your written English I'd suggest night school, or maybe a remedial college course.
If you are going to erroneously attempt to score points by referencing grammar, it's best to at least avoid very common and basic errors yourself. [quote] You would certainly know Judge Fields peculiarity just before passing sentence then? [/quote] Do inform us as to your apostrophe key being rendered inoperative due to use of American technology, or some such ridiculous attempt at an excuse for your glaring error. [quote] I have no so called character flaws [/quote] Oh, they are clear to anyone who has had the misfortune of reading your ramblings here. 'So called' could also do with a hypen, something you seem to use very generously when not appropriate but have omitted where preferred. If you'd like any further assistance with your written English I'd suggest night school, or maybe a remedial college course. Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 3

3:17pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Alan Bast*rd says...

Jeez, What a pair of bores. Spare the rest of us please!
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Jeez, What a pair of bores. Spare the rest of us please! Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz Alan Bast*rd
  • Score: -2

3:37pm Mon 18 Aug 14

Sandor Clegane says...

Alan Bast*rd wrote:
Jeez, What a pair of bores. Spare the rest of us please!
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
I take it you've never 'enjoyed' Itsamess' posting 'style' before, then?
[quote][p][bold]Alan Bast*rd[/bold] wrote: Jeez, What a pair of bores. Spare the rest of us please! Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz[/p][/quote]I take it you've never 'enjoyed' Itsamess' posting 'style' before, then? Sandor Clegane
  • Score: 0

4:05pm Mon 18 Aug 14

messyits says...

Sandor Clegane wrote:
@messyits: http://www.collinsdi

ctionary.com/diction

ary/english/publical

ly
Same dictionary..........

publicly
adverb
1. in a public manner, without concealment, or with consent of the public
2. in the name of or with consent of the public..

Do check the examples shown in both spellings
[quote][p][bold]Sandor Clegane[/bold] wrote: @messyits: http://www.collinsdi ctionary.com/diction ary/english/publical ly[/p][/quote]Same dictionary.......... publicly adverb 1. in a public manner, without concealment, or with consent of the public 2. in the name of or with consent of the public.. Do check the examples shown in both spellings messyits
  • Score: -4

4:07pm Mon 18 Aug 14

messyits says...

Alan Bast*rd wrote:
Jeez, What a pair of bores. Spare the rest of us please!
Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
Get in the flow.
[quote][p][bold]Alan Bast*rd[/bold] wrote: Jeez, What a pair of bores. Spare the rest of us please! Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz[/p][/quote]Get in the flow. messyits
  • Score: -5

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