Former Swindon Town Striker Vincent Pericard talks about his struggle with depression

Former Town striker Vincent Pericard

Former Town striker Vincent Pericard

First published in STFC News
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DURING his time at Swindon Town, Vincent Pericard contemplated taking his own life.

For a 29-year-old who had represented his country, France, at under 15 and under 17 level and had played alongside the great Zinedine Zidane at Juventus, the suicidal thoughts represented the culmination of a spiral of depression which began several years earlier and ruthlessly ripped his world apart.

Pericard battled with the invisible illness for several years, mostly in silence, rejecting the approaches of those closest to him, his partner, teammates, managers and friends. He fell back on alcohol and spending sprees to layer over the cracks. He felt unable to share his emotions for fear of being excommunicated by the industry he relied upon for an income.

By the end of it the striker was turning out for Fairford Town in the Hellenic League when he should have been at the peak of his career – in his own words a “surreal experience” which made him recognise the need to turn his life around.

The Advertiser meets Pericard at a hotel set against the backdrop of St Paul’s Cathedral in London in the hours before he makes a speech to a Kick It Out conference on the subjects of tolerance and equality in football.

He’s a very different character now compared to the timid, introverted man who shied away from any and all meaningful questions when this reporter last interviewed him back in 2011. Back then it was almost impossible to understand why he was so reserved. Three years later, over the course of an hour in his company, it all becomes abundantly clear.

Pericard is willing to share very personal experiences of his battle with depression – an ailment which, according to the Mental Health Foundation, affects one in five people nationwide. To put it into perspective, that would suggest that a seventh of Swindon’s current dressing room suffer from something similar, if perhaps much milder, in some way.

“The lowest I’ve gone is I’ve been suicidal,” he reveals, leaned forward into the conversation and maintaining eye contact where before his words were muffled into the floor as he looked for the quickest escape route.

“That’s crossed my mind, like ‘I can’t do it anymore, what is the point of me being here, what is the value I bring to the people who come here on Saturday, my life has got no worth’.

“It didn’t reach a point where I acted upon it but I did do things that would be detrimental behaviour, destructive behaviour. Getting very drunk because you just don’t care, spending lots of money because you just don’t care, disregarding relationships because you just don’t care, disregarding friends because you just don’t care. Those are destructive behaviours that players use to offload their depression.

“That’s the coping mechanism to help you cope with it.

“For no real reason, just because I had to let out that frustration, that inner trouble that I didn’t have any one else to support me . I was going out, drinking, taking my relationship for granted when I shouldn’t have.”

Pericard’s problems began during his second season at Portsmouth. Having impressed during a year on loan at Fratton Park, with nine goals in 32 appearances, the Cameroon-born forward ruptured his quadriceps four times in quick succession before injuring his cruciate ligament within days of his comeback.

He was sidelined for a year and his demons began to manifest themselves. In 2006, Pericard joined Stoke City where he enjoyed sporadic success under Tony Pulis, before he began to rediscover his love for the game during a short spell at Carlisle United in 2009.

When he arrived at the County Ground in 2010, signed by Danny Wilson, he felt as though he was finding his feet again. But he joined Town with a hamstring injury that had not healed in time for his debut.

Wilson wanted him to play anyway and he agreed.

“Obviously me, raring to go, I said yes when I shouldn’t have said yes because I wasn’t fit,” he recounts.

“When I played, not being fit, I broke down again. The fans didn’t know about this, they said ‘he doesn’t really run fast, he doesn’t really do this or that’ and the negativity was there.

“At that time I was competing with the likes of Charlie Austin and Billy Paynter and they were scoring for fun. When Billy left the fans expected me to replace him just like that, but it doesn’t happen like that. That went against me.

“I never really had the time to get myself right mentally and physically and show what I could do and that was hard. When I look back at my time there – the fans, the club, the environment – it was lovely, but I was disappointed to never get to know them and they didn’t get to know me.

“One of the main triggers (of depression) is injury. When you are injured you use your other coping mechanisms and for me that was destructive behaviour. I did that at Portsmouth, I had it at Stoke and I did it at Swindon.

“The first thing is on a Saturday night you go drinking and you drink to an extent which you know you shouldn’t but you want to forget. The next day you go to training and you don’t care – you don’t care how you perform in training, you don’t care if anyone finds out because you are just in that mood.

“I remember clearly at Swindon when after a game I would go home and actually drink indoors. I would go out and drink all night.

“It’s very, very sad. I was very frustrated and it made me feel very sad because I wasn’t respectful to the people that cared about me, the people who believed in me and it was a far cry from being that professional player, scoring goals, winning games. It wasn’t that at all.”

Pericard seems genuinely upset that he never obtained the mental state that would allow him to prove to Swindon fans exactly what he was all about.

“It didn’t go according to plan, I couldn’t deliver what the manager wanted of me and understandably the fans were frustrated with me. That turned into a vicious circle from which I couldn’t get out,” he said.

“The outcome was depression – going home, feeling very nervous, not happy, not wanting to train, feeling lethargic during training and during games, feeling scared of going out. All that made me realise I couldn’t do it anymore and made me realise I’m not the only player in that situation.

“It’s a day to day battle to get out of bed and leave. That’s what it felt like for me. It’s not a case of not feeling it today, it’s like everything is depressing. You don’t want to talk to anyone and everything is a nightmare.”

He suffered in silence, for fear of appearing weak within an industry that casts aside weakness like rotting fruit.

“It’s simply because the nature of the game dictates that we can’t show any weaknesses within the dressing room,” he explains. “It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed’ because we would be chopped and might not even be on the bench.

“If you don’t play, they don’t renew your contract and you’re out of a job. It’s the football environment that doesn’t give you the time and inclination to address any weaknesses like depression.”

Pericard made 40 appearances for Swindon, scoring just six times. He was mocked by his own supporters and heavily criticised by local media. He kept himself fit by playing for Fairford and then made the switch to Havant & Waterlooville, where the enormity of his fall from grace hit home.

“It was surreal,” he says. “I remember clearly I was on the pitch thinking ‘what am I doing here, why am I here?’ “I was looking around at other players, and I don’t want to appear arrogant, but you have to have to some self-pride. I was like ‘you had potential, you played with Zidane, now you are playing non-league football at 29 when you should have been at the peak of your career’.

“It was just surreal. I never thought it would get there. That’s what fuelled me to come out and make a difference. I wouldn’t want anyone to follow my career.”

Three years later, Pericard is using his own path to highlight the deep trauma depression can cause to sportmen and women.

His company, Elite Welfare Management (EWM) is making great strides in getting sports institutions – in the UK and abroad – to make an effort to understand the causes, symptoms and treatment of the disease. It’s having an effect.

Clubs like Manchester United, Manchester City, Stoke City and Reading have all welcomed Pericard into their spheres to speak to young players on the subject of depression and he and his team, including ex-Norwich City striker Leon MacKenzie, have held dialogue with the PFA, the FA and the Football League.

EWM has attracted greater attention in recent months, following the tragic passing of former Wales manager Gary Speed, and Pericard intends to make sure every possible step is taken to get football and other sports worldwide to understand, at least in part, the nature of the illness with which he was so badly afflicted.

“All through my career I’ve met players who have gone through what I’ve gone through and I realised that maybe there was a gap in the support for them. That is where Elite Welfare Management comes in,” he says.

“I think it has been fairly quick but I would say mainly because of the sudden death of Gary Speed. That was a tragic event that shocked everyone in the football community and really brought attention to mental illness and depression.

“Everyone saw him the day before or the week before as a manager, giving interviews, smiling and suddenly he’s not there. Off the back of that I’ve managed to convey the message ‘are we doing enough’.

“One of the examples Leon MacKenzie gives is one night he took a lot of pills, he had to be sent to hospital, the next day he went back to training and no one noticed what has happened. It makes you think ‘that is not normal. The major part is to get clubs to understand that it’s important to give players the understanding to address these issues and it’s not going to have an effect on their contracts or their selection on a Saturday.

“We see more and more cases of players getting in trouble or into depression because they haven’t got that faith.”

Comments (34)

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7:06am Tue 8 Apr 14

The Jockster says...

There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting.
Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son!
There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting. Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son! The Jockster
  • Score: 39

7:32am Tue 8 Apr 14

mancrobin says...

The Jockster wrote:
There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting.
Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son!
Yes, well said Jock and I also wish Vincent well in this new venture.

I suspect a good part of the problem is the constant requirement to perform and I doubt if that is about to change any time soon. Look how easily managers are sacked and I 'm surprised that mental illness doesn't appear to be a greater issue there.

It's interesting what Prericard says about Wilson playing him with a hamstring. Results at any cost? I also remember when it was reported that Pericard had returned to France and thinking, how nice to be paid £****,000 to go on holiday. How wrong I was.
[quote][p][bold]The Jockster[/bold] wrote: There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting. Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son![/p][/quote]Yes, well said Jock and I also wish Vincent well in this new venture. I suspect a good part of the problem is the constant requirement to perform and I doubt if that is about to change any time soon. Look how easily managers are sacked and I 'm surprised that mental illness doesn't appear to be a greater issue there. It's interesting what Prericard says about Wilson playing him with a hamstring. Results at any cost? I also remember when it was reported that Pericard had returned to France and thinking, how nice to be paid £****,000 to go on holiday. How wrong I was. mancrobin
  • Score: 4

8:34am Tue 8 Apr 14

GiulianoGrazioli says...

Gutted it never worked out at our club, I remember the excitement that we had signed him and every time he played I wanted him to take his chance with both hands... thought it was surreal he went non-league... now we all know why.

Fair play to him coming out and speaking openly - No grudges are held, I am glad he wore the Swindon shirt for 40 matches, just wish it could have been more.
Gutted it never worked out at our club, I remember the excitement that we had signed him and every time he played I wanted him to take his chance with both hands... thought it was surreal he went non-league... now we all know why. Fair play to him coming out and speaking openly - No grudges are held, I am glad he wore the Swindon shirt for 40 matches, just wish it could have been more. GiulianoGrazioli
  • Score: 8

9:08am Tue 8 Apr 14

Is that you Lovesey says...

He was a very very poor player for us, had a cople of good games which showed what he was capable of....

Now we all know why, I had the pleasure of meeting him once when Hart was in charge and we were on a corporate day, seemed like a nice guy, I have been following his career on Linkedin and I for one am pleased he is doing well helping others in the game.

Its such a shame that players are treated the way they are when they suffer with such a horrible illness as depression.

good luck VP wish you all the best
He was a very very poor player for us, had a cople of good games which showed what he was capable of.... Now we all know why, I had the pleasure of meeting him once when Hart was in charge and we were on a corporate day, seemed like a nice guy, I have been following his career on Linkedin and I for one am pleased he is doing well helping others in the game. Its such a shame that players are treated the way they are when they suffer with such a horrible illness as depression. good luck VP wish you all the best Is that you Lovesey
  • Score: 10

10:07am Tue 8 Apr 14

Oi Den! says...

He didn't look fit or motivated right from the start with us, whether that was from the hamstring injury or the very sad depression. None of us could have known the full story but it was plain to nearly everyone that he shouldn't have been playing as he was so ineffective. Hamstring injuries were the order of the day at STFC around that time, one of the signs of Wilson's poor management. Several Town managers have received stick over the last few years but for me Wilson is the only one who made a real mess of it, somehow managing to snatch dismal failure from the jaws of glory with a very good team. (I see it was the ref's fault Barnsley didn't win on Saturday.)

Good luck to Pericard and any other players who find themselves in a similar position. I hope he can help them.
He didn't look fit or motivated right from the start with us, whether that was from the hamstring injury or the very sad depression. None of us could have known the full story but it was plain to nearly everyone that he shouldn't have been playing as he was so ineffective. Hamstring injuries were the order of the day at STFC around that time, one of the signs of Wilson's poor management. Several Town managers have received stick over the last few years but for me Wilson is the only one who made a real mess of it, somehow managing to snatch dismal failure from the jaws of glory with a very good team. (I see it was the ref's fault Barnsley didn't win on Saturday.) Good luck to Pericard and any other players who find themselves in a similar position. I hope he can help them. Oi Den!
  • Score: 8

10:13am Tue 8 Apr 14

lifelong red says...

Yes I do feel for Vince Pericard. Mental illness has often been described as the invisible illness , one that cannot be seen or fully understood by many.
Yes I do feel for Vince Pericard. Mental illness has often been described as the invisible illness , one that cannot be seen or fully understood by many. lifelong red
  • Score: 5

10:48am Tue 8 Apr 14

bluesharpbob says...

A remarkable interview. A man of values and intelligence by the sound of it. It is so easy to judge in one's ignorance. To be honest I genuinely thought he must have had something as a player, by the fact of being with a top Italian team.

I was just disappointed that injuries prevented him from showing what he had and yes, I sadly remember the criticism that he suffered. Depression is a killer figuratively and sometimes literally. I have had first hand experience and can empathise with Vincent. It is truly great to see the good work he is doing now for those who may follow the same path as him. Well done Vince.
A remarkable interview. A man of values and intelligence by the sound of it. It is so easy to judge in one's ignorance. To be honest I genuinely thought he must have had something as a player, by the fact of being with a top Italian team. I was just disappointed that injuries prevented him from showing what he had and yes, I sadly remember the criticism that he suffered. Depression is a killer figuratively and sometimes literally. I have had first hand experience and can empathise with Vincent. It is truly great to see the good work he is doing now for those who may follow the same path as him. Well done Vince. bluesharpbob
  • Score: 6

11:03am Tue 8 Apr 14

Wilesy says...

Very good interview and sad to hear all that.

He didn't look fit when he was here apart from a few games when the crowd were singing his name, think he got injured again shortly after.

When you read things like that it makes you realise how detrimenatl PDC's style of public criticism may have been to his players - eg Luke Rooney, Cox, Caddis, Magera etc. Even take Gary Roberts, was flying at Huddersfield and now Chesterfield, but a forgettable Swindon season under PDC.
Very good interview and sad to hear all that. He didn't look fit when he was here apart from a few games when the crowd were singing his name, think he got injured again shortly after. When you read things like that it makes you realise how detrimenatl PDC's style of public criticism may have been to his players - eg Luke Rooney, Cox, Caddis, Magera etc. Even take Gary Roberts, was flying at Huddersfield and now Chesterfield, but a forgettable Swindon season under PDC. Wilesy
  • Score: 3

11:23am Tue 8 Apr 14

Swindon1984 says...

Very, very sad and just goes to show some of us could look at a professional footballer with envy, and won't understand why some might feel the way they do because we see them as having everything going for them - with depression however, it doesn't matter that everything can look alright from the outside, as the person suffering just doesn't may not be able to see any positives or feel any self worth. Should be a lesson to all of us that you can never quite appreciate a person's situation till you've walked in their shoes.
Very, very sad and just goes to show some of us could look at a professional footballer with envy, and won't understand why some might feel the way they do because we see them as having everything going for them - with depression however, it doesn't matter that everything can look alright from the outside, as the person suffering just doesn't may not be able to see any positives or feel any self worth. Should be a lesson to all of us that you can never quite appreciate a person's situation till you've walked in their shoes. Swindon1984
  • Score: 5

11:38am Tue 8 Apr 14

stfcflag says...

Very eloquently put Vince, you obviously know yourself well and are taking ownership of your demons, good man ! It makes you think of the effect we have from the terraces and that we don't always know players full stories...

Good luck in the future Vince, am chuffed you're helping others and seem to be doing so well personally. All the best for the future
Very eloquently put Vince, you obviously know yourself well and are taking ownership of your demons, good man ! It makes you think of the effect we have from the terraces and that we don't always know players full stories... Good luck in the future Vince, am chuffed you're helping others and seem to be doing so well personally. All the best for the future stfcflag
  • Score: 5

11:54am Tue 8 Apr 14

MITTED says...

Well done Vincent Pericard. It may be too late for your footballing career but you are putting back many times over. I can only wish you good health and happiness.
Well done Vincent Pericard. It may be too late for your footballing career but you are putting back many times over. I can only wish you good health and happiness. MITTED
  • Score: 6

1:29pm Tue 8 Apr 14

port de soller says...

Yes health is a must maybe get coaching badges etc,you had a gift yet with this illness is so so sad
Best wishes for the future
Yes health is a must maybe get coaching badges etc,you had a gift yet with this illness is so so sad Best wishes for the future port de soller
  • Score: 0

2:12pm Tue 8 Apr 14

beerdiddit says...

"All my pain" a poem i wrote about depression

If my arm was in a sling, or I walked with a stick
At least people would look at me,and say,oh yes he's sick
If I found it hard to breath, or had a nasty cough,
Again they'd take a look at me, and see that's why I'm off.

But all my pain's invisible, locked inside my head
No bandages upon my limbs where once the blood ran red,
No plaster cast or sutures, an injury to hide,
As all my pain's invisible looked up there inside.

Pull yourself together man, that phrase is often said,
They say There's nothing wrong with you, and it's all in your head!
If only it was easy, to cure the mental pain,
I wish I could reboot my self, turn off and start again.

There is no magic tablet, I wish there was my friend
Mental pain cannot be seen, it's not so quick to mend
The tunnel has some light in it, it's just not close at hand,
Like sailors with a telescope looking out for land,

They know that it is out there, for them one day to find
Like I know one day calm will come, to aid my troubled mind
But till the day I'm better, remember what I've said
All my pain's invisible locked inside my head.
"All my pain" a poem i wrote about depression If my arm was in a sling, or I walked with a stick At least people would look at me,and say,oh yes he's sick If I found it hard to breath, or had a nasty cough, Again they'd take a look at me, and see that's why I'm off. But all my pain's invisible, locked inside my head No bandages upon my limbs where once the blood ran red, No plaster cast or sutures, an injury to hide, As all my pain's invisible looked up there inside. Pull yourself together man, that phrase is often said, They say There's nothing wrong with you, and it's all in your head! If only it was easy, to cure the mental pain, I wish I could reboot my self, turn off and start again. There is no magic tablet, I wish there was my friend Mental pain cannot be seen, it's not so quick to mend The tunnel has some light in it, it's just not close at hand, Like sailors with a telescope looking out for land, They know that it is out there, for them one day to find Like I know one day calm will come, to aid my troubled mind But till the day I'm better, remember what I've said All my pain's invisible locked inside my head. beerdiddit
  • Score: 10

2:13pm Tue 8 Apr 14

bearwoodred says...

Stirling work Vincent and I wish him well in his venture to help others. Always thought he had a great touch and liked him as a striker but with Charlie and Billy it was always going to be hard whatever and when he did get on there was probably more pressure to score given their record.
Stirling work Vincent and I wish him well in his venture to help others. Always thought he had a great touch and liked him as a striker but with Charlie and Billy it was always going to be hard whatever and when he did get on there was probably more pressure to score given their record. bearwoodred
  • Score: 0

4:09pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Red Tuareg says...

Can there be any other occupation less compatible to depression ? I often wonder how players cope with the verbal abuse often meted out to them. It is often said football is a confidence game which is in very short supply when depression sets in.
Can there be any other occupation less compatible to depression ? I often wonder how players cope with the verbal abuse often meted out to them. It is often said football is a confidence game which is in very short supply when depression sets in. Red Tuareg
  • Score: 2

4:29pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Old-Stager, Hilperton says...

Absolutely no chance for Swindon Town to be promoted, or in fact Bristol City to be relegated ?
Or is there ? - Corals Bookmakers offer 50-1 for Town to go up, and City quoted at 40-1 to go down.
A £1 investment today on this unlikely double, would enable you to collect £2,091.00 on may 3rd.
Absolutely no chance for Swindon Town to be promoted, or in fact Bristol City to be relegated ? Or is there ? - Corals Bookmakers offer 50-1 for Town to go up, and City quoted at 40-1 to go down. A £1 investment today on this unlikely double, would enable you to collect £2,091.00 on may 3rd. Old-Stager, Hilperton
  • Score: -5

4:39pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Oxon-Red says...

The Jockster wrote:
There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting. Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son!
Jock,

Not a dig at all by the way, but I have brought VPs dilemna up a few times, including in my comments to you in the past, and mentioned it on Saturday in a post (wonder if this prompted Sam's article). Negative comment's, written or verbal, can be water of a duck's back or the straw...

But we paid our money...

Always felt Town looked a better side when VP was in it and Charlie often referred to this. Think he was probably too far down the slippery slope but wonder how encouragement may have helped.

I have never been a fan of detrimental comments to a Town player and wonder if a few at the CG could use their voices to encourage rather than discourage. At the Preston game we saw a transformation when the crowd got behind the team, okay they were encouraged by the surging runs of Gladwin but should that need to be the catalyst ?

COYMR
[quote][p][bold]The Jockster[/bold] wrote: There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting. Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son![/p][/quote]Jock, Not a dig at all by the way, but I have brought VPs dilemna up a few times, including in my comments to you in the past, and mentioned it on Saturday in a post (wonder if this prompted Sam's article). Negative comment's, written or verbal, can be water of a duck's back or the straw... But we paid our money... Always felt Town looked a better side when VP was in it and Charlie often referred to this. Think he was probably too far down the slippery slope but wonder how encouragement may have helped. I have never been a fan of detrimental comments to a Town player and wonder if a few at the CG could use their voices to encourage rather than discourage. At the Preston game we saw a transformation when the crowd got behind the team, okay they were encouraged by the surging runs of Gladwin but should that need to be the catalyst ? COYMR Oxon-Red
  • Score: 6

5:27pm Tue 8 Apr 14

the wizard says...

It takes a big man with a lot of courage to sit and bare all to somebody he doesn't know. If only we had known the half of it all at the time. Along with others I didn't have too many words for Big Vinnie, but always hoped he would prove me wrong.

I have great respect for the man now for not only baring his soul to us through media, but the ongoing good and priceless work he is doing to help others avert the same demons and crisis which he and others have had the burden of carrying. I can along with others only praise him going forward and wish him every success in the future. A good man contributing something worthwhile back into sport. I hope he gets good recognition for his work and future endeavors.
It takes a big man with a lot of courage to sit and bare all to somebody he doesn't know. If only we had known the half of it all at the time. Along with others I didn't have too many words for Big Vinnie, but always hoped he would prove me wrong. I have great respect for the man now for not only baring his soul to us through media, but the ongoing good and priceless work he is doing to help others avert the same demons and crisis which he and others have had the burden of carrying. I can along with others only praise him going forward and wish him every success in the future. A good man contributing something worthwhile back into sport. I hope he gets good recognition for his work and future endeavors. the wizard
  • Score: 1

6:02pm Tue 8 Apr 14

swwindon61uk says...

Worst forward i have seen at the CG, but now we know why, i wish him all the best.
Worst forward i have seen at the CG, but now we know why, i wish him all the best. swwindon61uk
  • Score: -2

6:44pm Tue 8 Apr 14

MisterD says...

The Jockster wrote:
There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting.
Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son!
I entirely agree. May he make a full recovery, and progress to better things, whatever form they may take.
[quote][p][bold]The Jockster[/bold] wrote: There but for the grace of God go I as the saying goes. Have to put my hand up and say I was one of VP's critics "cows arse with a banjo" etc. but it just goes to show that there is often more "behind the scenes" than what is portrayed as the finished product. I'm sure that many fans would have been far more sympathetic to Vince if they'd known what his mental state at the time was and trying to compete against CA & BP must've been daunting. Good to hear that he has come through all that trauma and is making a success of his life - well done son![/p][/quote]I entirely agree. May he make a full recovery, and progress to better things, whatever form they may take. MisterD
  • Score: 1

8:23pm Tue 8 Apr 14

mug? says...

I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive.

First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide"

"That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar"

er why? Surely it would still be a fifth?

The offensive:

I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else.

"It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed"

Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg?

Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?"

I did that and got the sack.

Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd"

No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..."

take it from someone who knows.

BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink.

FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY.

Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude.

This has made me angry.
I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry. mug?
  • Score: -3

9:28pm Tue 8 Apr 14

ellory says...

mug? wrote:
I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive.

First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide"

"That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar"

er why? Surely it would still be a fifth?

The offensive:

I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else.

"It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed"

Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg?

Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?"

I did that and got the sack.

Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd"

No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..."

take it from someone who knows.

BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink.

FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY.

Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude.

This has made me angry.
I appreciate your concerns, particularly if it's something that has affected you on a personal level - but this is just a man telling his story. Stigma surrounding mental illness in general is indeed rife in any workplace, but Vincent Pericard was a footballer. His experiences are obviously going to relate to that, and what he obviously feels prevented him and others seeking help. He is now trying to give a voice to players who may be suffering the same things.
.
Also, no one has suggested that Pericard is an alcoholic! Let alone all depressed people.
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your concerns, particularly if it's something that has affected you on a personal level - but this is just a man telling his story. Stigma surrounding mental illness in general is indeed rife in any workplace, but Vincent Pericard was a footballer. His experiences are obviously going to relate to that, and what he obviously feels prevented him and others seeking help. He is now trying to give a voice to players who may be suffering the same things. . Also, no one has suggested that Pericard is an alcoholic! Let alone all depressed people. ellory
  • Score: 1

9:28pm Tue 8 Apr 14

ellory says...

mug? wrote:
I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive.

First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide"

"That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar"

er why? Surely it would still be a fifth?

The offensive:

I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else.

"It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed"

Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg?

Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?"

I did that and got the sack.

Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd"

No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..."

take it from someone who knows.

BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink.

FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY.

Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude.

This has made me angry.
I appreciate your concerns, particularly if it's something that has affected you on a personal level - but this is just a man telling his story. Stigma surrounding mental illness in general is indeed rife in any workplace, but Vincent Pericard was a footballer. His experiences are obviously going to relate to that, and what he obviously feels prevented him and others seeking help. He is now trying to give a voice to players who may be suffering the same things.
.
Also, no one has suggested that Pericard is an alcoholic! Let alone all depressed people.
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.[/p][/quote]I appreciate your concerns, particularly if it's something that has affected you on a personal level - but this is just a man telling his story. Stigma surrounding mental illness in general is indeed rife in any workplace, but Vincent Pericard was a footballer. His experiences are obviously going to relate to that, and what he obviously feels prevented him and others seeking help. He is now trying to give a voice to players who may be suffering the same things. . Also, no one has suggested that Pericard is an alcoholic! Let alone all depressed people. ellory
  • Score: 1

9:57pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Oxon-Red says...

mug? wrote:
I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive.

First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide"

"That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar"

er why? Surely it would still be a fifth?

The offensive:

I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else.

"It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed"

Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg?

Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?"

I did that and got the sack.

Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd"

No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..."

take it from someone who knows.

BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink.

FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY.

Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude.

This has made me angry.
Agree to an extent but would say that in general people do not put themselves in the public eye and have strangers screaming abuse if they make an error. I also think things are changing with regard to mental health and employers are becoming more aware of it as an illness.

It has been brushed under the carpet in the past and people were told to pull themselves together, a man thing perhaps ? It is not just Footballers and Politicians that are special, they are in the public eye and we tend to hear their stories, Recently armed forces personnel have been in the news as post traumatic Syndrome (?) is being identified more and more.

I admire the fact that he has recognised his problem, sorted it out and is now helping others which IMO is the main thrust of the report.
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.[/p][/quote]Agree to an extent but would say that in general people do not put themselves in the public eye and have strangers screaming abuse if they make an error. I also think things are changing with regard to mental health and employers are becoming more aware of it as an illness. It has been brushed under the carpet in the past and people were told to pull themselves together, a man thing perhaps ? It is not just Footballers and Politicians that are special, they are in the public eye and we tend to hear their stories, Recently armed forces personnel have been in the news as post traumatic Syndrome (?) is being identified more and more. I admire the fact that he has recognised his problem, sorted it out and is now helping others which IMO is the main thrust of the report. Oxon-Red
  • Score: 2

10:12pm Tue 8 Apr 14

ellory says...

As a psychologist I have to agree with much of your post. It's pretty obvious that booing and constant negativity is no way to improve performance or self-confidence (the latter of which is so low during depression) and there's plenty of evidence that it can affect mood and performance. Unfortunately, football is emotive and many of our responses to VP were understandable at the time (I.e bovines and banjos!) as we were oblivious to his problems. I wouldn't dream of telling someone face to face what I said in the stands about Luongo's JPT penalty for example, but I was rather disappointed!..
.
We also have to consider the fact that depression is an illness. It is pervasive and there are many complexities surrounding recovery, and in the depths of a depressive episode there is little that can be done by strangers to intervene. We could have sung his name from the terraces every week and he would still most likely have experienced the symptoms he speaks of.
.
I think the most important thing we can do as fans is show our support to people like Vincent, and also help create an environment where we can encourage more players and people like him to seek help. I suppose that is what VP and EWM are currently trying to do.
.
If you are reading this Vincent, Nous vous souhaitons tout ce qu'il y a de meilleur, and I hope your health is better than my French! :-)
.
COYR
As a psychologist [in training!] I have to agree with much of your post. It's pretty obvious that booing and constant negativity is no way to improve performance or self-confidence (the latter of which is so low during depression) and there's plenty of evidence that it can affect mood and performance. Unfortunately, football is emotive and many of our responses to VP were understandable at the time (I.e bovines and banjos!) as we were oblivious to his problems. I wouldn't dream of telling someone face to face what I said in the stands about Luongo's JPT penalty for example, but I was rather disappointed!.. . We also have to consider the fact that depression is an illness. It is pervasive and there are many complexities surrounding recovery, and in the depths of a depressive episode there is little that can be done by strangers to intervene. We could have sung his name from the terraces every week and he would still most likely have experienced the symptoms he speaks of. . I think the most important thing we can do as fans is show our support to people like Vincent, and also help create an environment where we can encourage more players and people like him to seek help. I suppose that is what VP and EWM are currently trying to do. . If you are reading this Vincent, Nous vous souhaitons tout ce qu'il y a de meilleur, and I hope your health is better than my French! :-) . COYR ellory
  • Score: 3

10:15pm Tue 8 Apr 14

ellory says...

Whoops, that was meant to be in response to Oxon-Red! Doing well tonight, a double post and a disappearing quote!
Whoops, that was meant to be in response to Oxon-Red! Doing well tonight, a double post and a disappearing quote! ellory
  • Score: 0

10:20pm Tue 8 Apr 14

mug? says...

apologies but it grated.

re the abuse thing, sorry but it happens elsewhere off the football pitch. I have worked in Retail and I have had the misfortune of working in a call centre. I've been subjected what can only be describe as playground bullying while manning a till in a convenience store. I've been told of by the police for not challenging shop lifters. For the £4.10 I was paid an hour i quickly discovered I'd rather face the police and management giving me a bollocking than a drugged up customer.

Working in a call centre I had all kind of abuse. The one that most grated was a man who said "Do you know how much money I pay to this company? You are useless"

As a professional, you can't fight back at them. Footballers occasionally do.

I've seen abuse being given to other people in other professions. Security guards, police, paramedics, doctors, nurses much worse than footballers get.

No. It isn't acceptable behaviour.

When I was called useless, it really hit a nerve because it's something *I* believe about myself.

Sometimes someone will say - hey, you're no good at such and such and I'll be inclined to say "hang on a minute your wrong there" and I do my best to prove them wrong.

I believe, that would have been the way I would have responded to Mr Di-Canio's methods, as long as he didn't say the very words that did hit the wrong spot.
apologies but it grated. re the abuse thing, sorry but it happens elsewhere off the football pitch. I have worked in Retail and I have had the misfortune of working in a call centre. I've been subjected what can only be describe as playground bullying while manning a till in a convenience store. I've been told of by the police for not challenging shop lifters. For the £4.10 I was paid an hour i quickly discovered I'd rather face the police and management giving me a bollocking than a drugged up customer. Working in a call centre I had all kind of abuse. The one that most grated was a man who said "Do you know how much money I pay to this company? You are useless" As a professional, you can't fight back at them. Footballers occasionally do. I've seen abuse being given to other people in other professions. Security guards, police, paramedics, doctors, nurses much worse than footballers get. No. It isn't acceptable behaviour. When I was called useless, it really hit a nerve because it's something *I* believe about myself. Sometimes someone will say - hey, you're no good at such and such and I'll be inclined to say "hang on a minute your wrong there" and I do my best to prove them wrong. I believe, that would have been the way I would have responded to Mr Di-Canio's methods, as long as he didn't say the very words that did hit the wrong spot. mug?
  • Score: 2

10:26pm Tue 8 Apr 14

spudandpops says...

Well done Vincent for having the balls and the honesty to share your story , I'm sure by doing this you will help more people than you will ever know .
Good Luck in the future & Stay Safe .
Well done Vincent for having the balls and the honesty to share your story , I'm sure by doing this you will help more people than you will ever know . Good Luck in the future & Stay Safe . spudandpops
  • Score: 3

11:04pm Tue 8 Apr 14

Oxon-Red says...

mug? wrote:
apologies but it grated.

re the abuse thing, sorry but it happens elsewhere off the football pitch. I have worked in Retail and I have had the misfortune of working in a call centre. I've been subjected what can only be describe as playground bullying while manning a till in a convenience store. I've been told of by the police for not challenging shop lifters. For the £4.10 I was paid an hour i quickly discovered I'd rather face the police and management giving me a bollocking than a drugged up customer.

Working in a call centre I had all kind of abuse. The one that most grated was a man who said "Do you know how much money I pay to this company? You are useless"

As a professional, you can't fight back at them. Footballers occasionally do.

I've seen abuse being given to other people in other professions. Security guards, police, paramedics, doctors, nurses much worse than footballers get.

No. It isn't acceptable behaviour.

When I was called useless, it really hit a nerve because it's something *I* believe about myself.

Sometimes someone will say - hey, you're no good at such and such and I'll be inclined to say "hang on a minute your wrong there" and I do my best to prove them wrong.

I believe, that would have been the way I would have responded to Mr Di-Canio's methods, as long as he didn't say the very words that did hit the wrong spot.
No apologies needed IMO, no one is useless be it a footballer or a Call Centre employee and no one should be abused for trying to do their job. Guess I have been lucky because my boss has appreciated his team and always defended them, harsh at times but always fair.

Hopefully things are changing and I hope you find a boss like mine because, as I have said above in posts, support is more likely to bring out the best in people.
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: apologies but it grated. re the abuse thing, sorry but it happens elsewhere off the football pitch. I have worked in Retail and I have had the misfortune of working in a call centre. I've been subjected what can only be describe as playground bullying while manning a till in a convenience store. I've been told of by the police for not challenging shop lifters. For the £4.10 I was paid an hour i quickly discovered I'd rather face the police and management giving me a bollocking than a drugged up customer. Working in a call centre I had all kind of abuse. The one that most grated was a man who said "Do you know how much money I pay to this company? You are useless" As a professional, you can't fight back at them. Footballers occasionally do. I've seen abuse being given to other people in other professions. Security guards, police, paramedics, doctors, nurses much worse than footballers get. No. It isn't acceptable behaviour. When I was called useless, it really hit a nerve because it's something *I* believe about myself. Sometimes someone will say - hey, you're no good at such and such and I'll be inclined to say "hang on a minute your wrong there" and I do my best to prove them wrong. I believe, that would have been the way I would have responded to Mr Di-Canio's methods, as long as he didn't say the very words that did hit the wrong spot.[/p][/quote]No apologies needed IMO, no one is useless be it a footballer or a Call Centre employee and no one should be abused for trying to do their job. Guess I have been lucky because my boss has appreciated his team and always defended them, harsh at times but always fair. Hopefully things are changing and I hope you find a boss like mine because, as I have said above in posts, support is more likely to bring out the best in people. Oxon-Red
  • Score: 3

8:42am Wed 9 Apr 14

Swindon1984 says...

mug? wrote:
I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.
He's speaking as a footballer, what do you expect him to say? In some ways your argument only backs up an existing stereotype, that people in certain walks of life shouldn't be depressed, that they're lives look so attractive they have no excuse for it. Clinical depression isn't simply down to circumstance, it can affect anyone just the same regardless of their social standing, career prospects, financial status etc.

My sympathies go out to anyone who's had problems of this nature, but you seem to have taken this as an opportunity to criticise rather than identify with someone who may have, at one stage, been facing the same challenges as yourself.

"FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL." Exactly - which means that they can suffer from these types of problems as well, and are just as entitled to support.
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.[/p][/quote]He's speaking as a footballer, what do you expect him to say? In some ways your argument only backs up an existing stereotype, that people in certain walks of life shouldn't be depressed, that they're lives look so attractive they have no excuse for it. Clinical depression isn't simply down to circumstance, it can affect anyone just the same regardless of their social standing, career prospects, financial status etc. My sympathies go out to anyone who's had problems of this nature, but you seem to have taken this as an opportunity to criticise rather than identify with someone who may have, at one stage, been facing the same challenges as yourself. "FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL." Exactly - which means that they can suffer from these types of problems as well, and are just as entitled to support. Swindon1984
  • Score: 3

9:42pm Wed 9 Apr 14

mug? says...

Swindon1984 wrote:
mug? wrote:
I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.
He's speaking as a footballer, what do you expect him to say? In some ways your argument only backs up an existing stereotype, that people in certain walks of life shouldn't be depressed, that they're lives look so attractive they have no excuse for it. Clinical depression isn't simply down to circumstance, it can affect anyone just the same regardless of their social standing, career prospects, financial status etc.

My sympathies go out to anyone who's had problems of this nature, but you seem to have taken this as an opportunity to criticise rather than identify with someone who may have, at one stage, been facing the same challenges as yourself.

"FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL." Exactly - which means that they can suffer from these types of problems as well, and are just as entitled to support.
I've never said people in certain walks of life don't get depressed.

The points I was refering to in the article were those where he was saying that and I quote

"Leon MacKenzie gives is one night he took a lot of pills, he had to be sent to hospital, the next day he went back to training and no one noticed what has happened. It makes you think ‘that is not normal. The major part is to get clubs to understand that it’s important to give players the understanding to address these issues and it’s not going to have an effect on their contracts or their selection on a Saturday."

I'm sorry, but that is pretty normal. No one in any or the workplaces I have worked at knew that I'd cut myself the previous night.

My point again, Football isn't any different to any other industry.

I read the article as saying that Football is different to everywhere else when it isn't and made my points to that effect.

I'll also reiterate that Football isn't the only sector where employees receive abuse.
[quote][p][bold]Swindon1984[/bold] wrote: [quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: I find this a bit bizarre and mildly offensive. First, the bizarre: Depression, "affects on in five people nationwide" "That would suggest that a seventh of Swindon's current dressing room suffer from something similar" er why? Surely it would still be a fifth? The offensive: I do get the impression that like politicians, footballers live on a different planet and think they are above everyone else. "It’s not acceptable that you raise your hand and say ‘gaffer, I’m not feeling well, I’m depressed" Does he really think that can be done off of planet zogg? Does he think joe average can just phone up work and say "sorry I didn't go into work today but I'm really depressed and didn't get out of bed until after midday?" I did that and got the sack. Do these guys think you can just wander into the work place and say "hey guys, I was feeling pretty down last night, so I cut myself and it made me feel better" or "hey, I was in hospital last night because I OD'd" No, you can not. Some of your colleagues will find it offensive. Yes, some will understand but in the main - it'll be "there's the door..." take it from someone who knows. BTW, depression doesn't necessarily = alcoholic. Alcohol makes things much worse. I rarely drink. FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL. GET OVER YOURSELVES. FOOTBALL IS NO DIFFERENT FROM ANYWHERE ELSE OR ANY OTHER INDUSTRY. Yes, highlighting and foraging for understanding of mental health can only be a good thing but seriously, get rid of the hey, we're footballers, we're special attitude. This has made me angry.[/p][/quote]He's speaking as a footballer, what do you expect him to say? In some ways your argument only backs up an existing stereotype, that people in certain walks of life shouldn't be depressed, that they're lives look so attractive they have no excuse for it. Clinical depression isn't simply down to circumstance, it can affect anyone just the same regardless of their social standing, career prospects, financial status etc. My sympathies go out to anyone who's had problems of this nature, but you seem to have taken this as an opportunity to criticise rather than identify with someone who may have, at one stage, been facing the same challenges as yourself. "FOOTBALLERS, YOU ARE NOTHING SPECIAL." Exactly - which means that they can suffer from these types of problems as well, and are just as entitled to support.[/p][/quote]I've never said people in certain walks of life don't get depressed. The points I was refering to in the article were those where he was saying that and I quote "Leon MacKenzie gives is one night he took a lot of pills, he had to be sent to hospital, the next day he went back to training and no one noticed what has happened. It makes you think ‘that is not normal. The major part is to get clubs to understand that it’s important to give players the understanding to address these issues and it’s not going to have an effect on their contracts or their selection on a Saturday." I'm sorry, but that is pretty normal. No one in any or the workplaces I have worked at knew that I'd cut myself the previous night. My point again, Football isn't any different to any other industry. I read the article as saying that Football is different to everywhere else when it isn't and made my points to that effect. I'll also reiterate that Football isn't the only sector where employees receive abuse. mug?
  • Score: 0

10:09pm Wed 9 Apr 14

mug? says...

Also, to that regard, where is the article on the call centre worker with depression?

Where is the article on the construction worker with depression?

Where is the article of the NHS doctor with depression? (There are a LOT of them, possibly more NHS employees with depression than any other industry ( I can not substantiate this but I've tried to find some figures) mainly because of the shocking treatment they receive from their employers and from their patients)

Could it be that no one cares about the call centre worker? the construction worker? The GP? The cleaner?

Take all of those people out of modern civilisation and there will be a lot of problems. The world truly is standing on it's head.

To say I'm insinuating that footballers don't get depression is well wide of the mark. My issue is that this article seems to suggest that Football is different to other industries with the way they deal or support their workforce when it isn't.
Also, to that regard, where is the article on the call centre worker with depression? Where is the article on the construction worker with depression? Where is the article of the NHS doctor with depression? (There are a LOT of them, possibly more NHS employees with depression than any other industry ( I can not substantiate this but I've tried to find some figures) mainly because of the shocking treatment they receive from their employers and from their patients) Could it be that no one cares about the call centre worker? the construction worker? The GP? The cleaner? Take all of those people out of modern civilisation and there will be a lot of problems. The world truly is standing on it's head. To say I'm insinuating that footballers don't get depression is well wide of the mark. My issue is that this article seems to suggest that Football is different to other industries with the way they deal or support their workforce when it isn't. mug?
  • Score: 0

10:58pm Wed 9 Apr 14

Oxon-Red says...

mug? wrote:
Also, to that regard, where is the article on the call centre worker with depression?

Where is the article on the construction worker with depression?

Where is the article of the NHS doctor with depression? (There are a LOT of them, possibly more NHS employees with depression than any other industry ( I can not substantiate this but I've tried to find some figures) mainly because of the shocking treatment they receive from their employers and from their patients)

Could it be that no one cares about the call centre worker? the construction worker? The GP? The cleaner?

Take all of those people out of modern civilisation and there will be a lot of problems. The world truly is standing on it's head.

To say I'm insinuating that footballers don't get depression is well wide of the mark. My issue is that this article seems to suggest that Football is different to other industries with the way they deal or support their workforce when it isn't.
Big bugbear of mine, managers. IMO they cause much of the problems, they make the decisions but put the workers in the front line to face the Sh1t.

Please everyone look at the following link and say this doesn't apply:

http://stories-etc.c
om/worker-ant.htm
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: Also, to that regard, where is the article on the call centre worker with depression? Where is the article on the construction worker with depression? Where is the article of the NHS doctor with depression? (There are a LOT of them, possibly more NHS employees with depression than any other industry ( I can not substantiate this but I've tried to find some figures) mainly because of the shocking treatment they receive from their employers and from their patients) Could it be that no one cares about the call centre worker? the construction worker? The GP? The cleaner? Take all of those people out of modern civilisation and there will be a lot of problems. The world truly is standing on it's head. To say I'm insinuating that footballers don't get depression is well wide of the mark. My issue is that this article seems to suggest that Football is different to other industries with the way they deal or support their workforce when it isn't.[/p][/quote]Big bugbear of mine, managers. IMO they cause much of the problems, they make the decisions but put the workers in the front line to face the Sh1t. Please everyone look at the following link and say this doesn't apply: http://stories-etc.c om/worker-ant.htm Oxon-Red
  • Score: 0

11:43am Thu 10 Apr 14

Swindon1984 says...

mug? wrote:
Also, to that regard, where is the article on the call centre worker with depression? Where is the article on the construction worker with depression? Where is the article of the NHS doctor with depression? (There are a LOT of them, possibly more NHS employees with depression than any other industry ( I can not substantiate this but I've tried to find some figures) mainly because of the shocking treatment they receive from their employers and from their patients) Could it be that no one cares about the call centre worker? the construction worker? The GP? The cleaner? Take all of those people out of modern civilisation and there will be a lot of problems. The world truly is standing on it's head. To say I'm insinuating that footballers don't get depression is well wide of the mark. My issue is that this article seems to suggest that Football is different to other industries with the way they deal or support their workforce when it isn't.
Again to be fair, this is a football forum - I don't think anyone's trying to ignore people working in other areas who have problems, but you're not going to hear about them on this site, for obvious reasons. The quote you'd put in again is someone speaking on behalf of their own industry, and saying people acted like it was normal was only drawing attention to the fact that it shouldn't be.

Clearly this issue is very close to you and I sympathise, but looking at it objectively, I don't think anyone in the interviews said anything wrong - they could have made a token statement to the effect of "depression affects people in all walks of life" etc but they can only speak for themselves.
[quote][p][bold]mug?[/bold] wrote: Also, to that regard, where is the article on the call centre worker with depression? Where is the article on the construction worker with depression? Where is the article of the NHS doctor with depression? (There are a LOT of them, possibly more NHS employees with depression than any other industry ( I can not substantiate this but I've tried to find some figures) mainly because of the shocking treatment they receive from their employers and from their patients) Could it be that no one cares about the call centre worker? the construction worker? The GP? The cleaner? Take all of those people out of modern civilisation and there will be a lot of problems. The world truly is standing on it's head. To say I'm insinuating that footballers don't get depression is well wide of the mark. My issue is that this article seems to suggest that Football is different to other industries with the way they deal or support their workforce when it isn't.[/p][/quote]Again to be fair, this is a football forum - I don't think anyone's trying to ignore people working in other areas who have problems, but you're not going to hear about them on this site, for obvious reasons. The quote you'd put in again is someone speaking on behalf of their own industry, and saying people acted like it was normal was only drawing attention to the fact that it shouldn't be. Clearly this issue is very close to you and I sympathise, but looking at it objectively, I don't think anyone in the interviews said anything wrong - they could have made a token statement to the effect of "depression affects people in all walks of life" etc but they can only speak for themselves. Swindon1984
  • Score: 1

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